Lab 1 - Library of Chemists

Lab 1 - Library of Chemists - A Library for Chemists A...

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A Library for Chemists 1 Cornerstone Chemistry A Library for Chemists You have seen how iodine can be extracted and isolated from a natural product such as seaweed. In this investigation we will study some of iodine's properties and compare these observations to those found in the chemical literature. In addition to this, we will study the properties of another element, namely the metal zinc. Some of the data you will be collecting can be represented by graphs. You will be introduced to a commercial graphing software program that many scientists use called Excel for Windows. Why is graphing such an important technique? Because it allows us to see the relationship between two variables. From this relationship we can write an equation that can be used to predict the value of one variable knowing the other. This is nice because we don't have to work in the lab every time we want to know something or look through pages and pages of graphs. Instead we can carry a small digit equation in our minds. This is quite handy don't you think?
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2 A Library for Chemists Cornerstone Chemistry FOCUS QUESTIONS : 1. How well does the appearance and solubility, of iodine and zinc respectively compare with information presented in the CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics? 2. What is the graphical (graph shape), mathematical (equation of the graph) and numerical (value of slope and y-intercept) relationship between the mass of a piece of zinc and the volume of space it occupies? A Pre-Lab Checklist Hand in Warm-Up Summarize or Flow Diagram Procedure. Make Photocopy of Summary to hand in. Optional: Bring in PC disk to save computer work done in lab Warm-Up Exploring Straight Lines Before you go any further, get some graph paper, a sharp pencil and ruler. This is an interactive exercise which will be invaluable for this and future lab activities. Why are straight line graphs important? Straight line graphs represent one of the simplest ways to understand relationships between two variables. For example, a straight line graph indicates to a scientist or mathematician that one variable is proportional to another: as one variable increases so does the other by a certain factor, or as one variable increases the other
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A Library for Chemists 3 Cornerstone Chemistry decreases by a factor. In many instances, scientists look for the simplest relationship between variables—they "look for linearity"—before testing out more complex relationships. This method is analogous to searching for a misplaced object. Most people would probably begin their search at the most likely places the object could be found and move to the more unlikely. There is no law you have to do it this way, but it could save you time recovering the object. Another example might be relating a story to a friend. Most people tell a story with a beginning, middle and end that is chronological in time. This is not the only way to tell a story, but it is one way that will allow the listener to easily comprehend what you are saying. In terms of graphing, it is easier to graph simple relationships than more complicated ones. So
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Lab 1 - Library of Chemists - A Library for Chemists A...

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