Lab Introduction

Lab Introduction - Cornerstone Chemistry Investigating the...

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Unformatted text preview: Cornerstone Chemistry Investigating the Fundamentals of Chemical Change For Student-Scientists enrolled in CHEM 111 Stephen DeMeo 6th Edition 2 Introduction Cornerstone Chemistry Copyright 2002 Introduction 3 Cornerstone Chemistry Table of Contents Introduction A Few Words Acknowledgments Becoming a Novice Scientist The Laboratory Notebook Responsibilities and Grading Safety and Disposal Experimental Activities Lab 1: A Library for Chemists Lab 2: The Redox Arena Lab 3: The Castle of Quantification Lab 4: The Air We Breathe: The Gas Laws Lab 5: 68th and Zinc Lab 6: pH at the UN Appendix A: The Tool Box B: Periodic Table 4 Introduction Cornerstone Chemistry A Few Words You are about to embark on an exciting adventure into the chemistry laboratory. Like many trips into the unknown or little known, yours has a purpose, which is, to make sense of your work in the lab. The drive to make sense ! to understand ! will lead you to reconstruct some of the fundamental knowledge on which chemistry is based, what I like to call Corner Stone Chemistry. IF this goal sounds vague to you, let me draw out an analogy that we all can understand. Almost everyday as I walk down Lexington Avenue I am stunned by the New York City skyline. The skyscrapers, the fascinating architecture, the old and the new, the variety and scale are truly impressive. And what is more amazing is this skyline is not static, it changes over time as buildings fall and new ones are built. The City is continually in the process of reinventing itself. Our kinship with our buildings and the dual drive to tear down and rebuild is aptly expressed in chemistry. Chemists are architects of sorts; they construct molecular skyscrapers on the sub- microscopic level by bringing different groups of atoms together during a synthesis, as well as fragmenting compounds by decomposing them into their smaller atomic pieces. The creations of chemists rival the greatness and aesthetic appeal of any building in New York City; if it wasnt for chemists creating new pharmaceuticals there would not be cures for diseases like polio, whooping cough, measles, and rubella. Without electrochemists, there wouldnt be any batteries ! no radios, no pacemakers, no calculators. Without chemists and their dyes we would live less in color and more in a black and white world. Without chemists conducting research with fuels and plastics, space travel would not have been possible. And without chemists finding new metal alloys, many of the skyscrapers in the City would never have been built. We can also use the analogy of architecture and apply it to learning. As a student of chemistry you might feel that you are a stranger in a strange land, that the teacher is speaking a foreign language. This feeling is not surprising for novices who have to decipher the nuances between language and meaning. For example take the substance HC 2 H 3 O 2 , it will be referred to as acetic acid, enthanoic acid and sometimes its common name vinegar will be used. They as acetic acid, enthanoic acid and sometimes its common name vinegar will be used....
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This note was uploaded on 09/21/2011 for the course CHEMISTRY 134 taught by Professor Lesliemcmillan during the Spring '11 term at ASU.

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Lab Introduction - Cornerstone Chemistry Investigating the...

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