POL 004 - Darren Pinder Machiavelli’s philosophy on the nature of man is that man possesses both good and bad qualities but will lean towards his

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Unformatted text preview: Darren Pinder March 15, 2010 Machiavelli’s philosophy on the nature of man is that man possesses both good and bad qualities, but will lean towards his self-interests when all things are equal: thus man is a fickle creature. In papers #10 and #51 of the Federalist Papers , Madison writes on how differences of opinions can create factions within a group and subsequently any body of government. The writings of Madison coincide with Machiavelli’s dim view of human nature and explain how this nature affects political thinking and structuring in America. Madison understands that as men we look out for our self-interest and will always seek to promote it. “No man is allowed to be a judge in his own cause because his interest would certainly bias his judgment, and, not improbably, corrupt his integrity” (74). When men have similar interests, they collaborate to promote them. Factions are inevitable given the nature of man. “As long as the reason of man continues fallible, and he is at liberty to exercise it, different man....
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This note was uploaded on 09/21/2011 for the course POL 004 taught by Professor Taylor,r during the Summer '08 term at UC Davis.

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POL 004 - Darren Pinder Machiavelli’s philosophy on the nature of man is that man possesses both good and bad qualities but will lean towards his

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