C7-9 11 CASTILLO VS PADILLA.pdf - SUPREME COURT REPORTS ANNOTATED VOLUME 127 VOL 127 743 Castillo vs Padilla Jr Adm Case No 2339 JOSE M CASTILLO

C7-9 11 CASTILLO VS PADILLA.pdf - SUPREME COURT REPORTS...

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3/9/2020 SUPREME COURT REPORTS ANNOTATED VOLUME 127 1/4 VOL. 127, FEBRUARY 24, 1984 743 Castillo vs. Padilla, Jr. Adm. Case No. 2339. February 24, 1984. * JOSE M. CASTILLO, complainant, vs. ATTY. SABINO PADILLA, JR., respondent. Legal Ethics; Attorneys; Suspension from practice of law; Use of insulting language; Duties of an attorney .—Among the duties of an attorney are: (1) to observe and maintain the respect due to the courts of justice; and (2) to abstain from all offensive personality and to advance no fact prejudicial to the honor or reputation of a party or witness unless required by the justice of the cause with which he is charged. (Rules of Court, Rule 138, Sec. 20 (b) and (f).) The Canons of Professional Ethics likewise exhort lawyers to avoid all personalities between counsel. (Canon 17.) Same; Same; Same; Same; Same; Utterance by attorney of the words “Ay que bobo” upon a fellow lawyer, offensive and uncalled for and exhibits lack of respect upon a fellow lawyer and to the court. —Whether directed at the person of complainant or his manner of offering evidence, the remark “bobo” or “Ay, que bobo” was offensive and uncalled for. Respondent had no right to interrupt complainant which such cutting remark while the latter was addressing the court. In so doing, he exhibited lack of respect not only to a fellow lawyer but also to the court. By the use of intemperate language, respondent failed to measure up to the norm of conduct required of a member of the legal profession, which all the more deserves reproach because this is not the first time that respondent has employed offensive language in the course of judicial proceedings. He has previously been admonished to refrain from engaging in offensive personalities and warned to be more circumspect in the preparation of his pleadings. (CA-G.R. No. 09753-SP, Court of Appeals; Civil Case No. C-7790 CFI of Caloocan.)
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  • Fall '19
  • Atty. Elgin Perez
  • Supreme Court of the United States, Lawyer

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