chapter 4 - GlobalizationDimensions Chapter4...

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Wednesday, Septemb MGMT - 650, Globalization  Dimensions , Chapter 4 1 Globalization Dimensions Chapter 4
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Textile Alliance Apparel factory in Qingxi Township,  China that produces shirts and pants to major  brands, including J.Crew, Hugo Boss and Burberry
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NY Times, September 12,  2010 “multinational companies and trade associations in the clean energy business, as in many other industries, have been wary of filing trade cases, fearing Chinese officials’ reputation for retaliating against joint ventures in their country and potentially denying market access to any company that takes sides against China.” Similar intimidation has surely helped discourage action on the currency front. So this is a good time to remember that what’s good for multinational companies is often bad for America, especially its workers. Wednesday, Septemb MGMT - 650, Globalization  Dimensions , Chapter 4 4
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Wednesday, Septemb MGMT - 650, Globalization  Dimensions , Chapter 4 5 Walter E. Hoadley  Walter E. Hoadley (1998), former executive Vice President of Bank America, argues that in a global economy the distinction between economic and non- economic forces is not clear. He proclaims: Greater recognition will have to be given to the effects of non-economic, e.g., social, political, psychological, technological, ethical, etc., forces shaping the future. The distinction between economic and non-economic cannot be precise. Some blending frequently occurs, but public interest will place more emphasis on the human emotional aspects of life. Failure to recognize this change can be costly, invite more tensions, and generate disruptive social unrest.
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NY Times, Sept. 11, 2010 The group,  Baikal Environmental Wave , was  organizing protests against Prime Minister  Vladimir V. Putin ’s decision to  reopen a paper facto that had polluted nearby Lake Baikal, a natural  wonder that by some estimates holds 20 percent of the world’s fresh water.  Instead, the group fell victim to one of the authoritie newest tactics for quelling dissent: confiscating  computers under the pretext of searching for pirated Microsoft  software Wednesday, Septemb MGMT - 650, Globalization  Dimensions , Chapter 4 6
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NY Times, Sept. 11, 2010  Continued Across Russia, the security services have carried out dozens of similar raids against outspoken advocacy groups or opposition newspapers in recent years. Security officials say the inquiries reflect their concern about software piracy, which is rampant in Russia. Yet they rarely if ever carry out raids against advocacy groups or news organizations that back the government. As the ploy grows common, the authorities are receiving
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This note was uploaded on 09/21/2011 for the course ECON 101 taught by Professor Flah during the Spring '10 term at Punjab Engineering College.

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chapter 4 - GlobalizationDimensions Chapter4...

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