lect_16 - Functions Intro to Induction Margaret M. Fleck 26...

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Unformatted text preview: Functions Intro to Induction Margaret M. Fleck 26 February 2010 This lecture finishes up functions and introduces mathematical induction (section 4.1 of Rosen). 1 Announcements Midterms should be graded mid next week. The last conflict exams will be Tuesday afternoon. Solutions should be released soon after those are done. Soon after midterm grades appear, I will also release mock averages, which are weighted combinations of the first midterm, first quiz, and the first four homeworks. Well also supply information on how to interpret these numbers in terms of letter grades, so you can see where you stand at the moment. 2 Warmup using 2D points Mondays lecture probably went by really fast since you were all worrying about the midterm. So, lets remember what it means to prove that a specific function is, say, onto. Let f : Z 2 Z be defined by f ( x, y ) = x + y . I claim that f is onto. First, lets make sure we know how to read this definition. f : Z 2 is 1 shorthand for Z Z , which is the set of pairs of integers. So f maps a pair of integers to a single integer, which is the sum of the two coordinates. To prove that f is onto, we need to pick some arbitrary element y in the co-domain. That is to say, y is an integer. Then we need to find a sample value in the domain that maps onto y , i.e. a preimage of y . At this point, it helps to fiddle around on our scratch paper, to come up with a suitable preimage. In this case, (0 , y ) will work nicely. So our proof looks like: Proof: Let y be an element of Z . Then (0 , y ) is an element of f : Z 2 and f (0 , y ) = 0 + y = y . Since this construction will work for any choice of y , weve shown that f is onto. 3 Another proof involving composition Last class, we saw a proof of the following fact: Claim 1 For any sets A , B , and C and for any functions f : A B and g : B C , if f and g are injective, then g f is also injective. Lets prove a similar claim involving surjective: Claim 2 For any sets A , B , and C and for any functions f : A B and g : B C , if f and g are surjective, then g f is also surjective. Proof: Let A , B , and C be sets. Let f : A B and g : B C be functions. Suppose that f and g are surjective. We need to show that g f is surjective. That is, we need to show that for any element x in C , there is an element y in A such that ( g f )( y ) = x . So, pick some element x in C . Since g is surjective, there is an element z in B such that g ( z ) = x . Since f is surjective, there is an element y in A such that f ( y ) = z ....
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This note was uploaded on 09/21/2011 for the course CS 173 taught by Professor Erickson during the Spring '08 term at University of Illinois, Urbana Champaign.

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lect_16 - Functions Intro to Induction Margaret M. Fleck 26...

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