Traumatic_Brain_Injury_(Autosaved).docx - Traumatic brain injury(TBI is a major cause of death and disability in the United States it contributes to 30

Traumatic_Brain_Injury_(Autosaved).docx - Traumatic brain...

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Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major cause of death and disability in the United States, it contributes to 30% of all injury deaths. In the United States, 138 people die every day from injuries that include TBI. Those who survive a TBI can face effects lasting a few days to disabilities which may last the rest of their lives. TBI is defined as a nondegenerative, non- congenital insult to the brain from an external mechanical force, possibly leading to permanent or temporary impairment of cognitive, physical, and psychosocial functions, with an associated diminished or altered state of consciousness. TBI may be classified as mild, moderate or severe. Men are three times as likely to be affected, hospitalized, and die from traumatic brain injury than women. This paper will investigate the effect TBI has on women and how to avoid the complications post trauma. For a TBI to be considered mild an individual must suffer a loss of consciousness of 30 minutes’ duration or longer, a duration of post-traumatic amnesia of less than 1 hour and a Glasgow Coma Scale score of 13-15. To be considered moderate, the LOC (loss of consciousness would have to be less than 24 hours, the duration of PTA (post-traumatic amnesia) would be between 1 and 7 days, and the GCS (Glasgow Coma Score) is 9-12. Lastly, to be diagnosed with severe TBI you must have had an LOC greater than 24 hours, the duration of PTA is greater than 7 days, and the GCS score is less than or equal to 8 (Watanabe, 2016). In a research article by Resnick, Mallamapalli and Carter (2012), two specific questions were addressed for guiding the study; First, the differences in how blunt trauma may play a role in treatment paradigms and recovery; secondly, the emerging literature that is suggestive that gender differences may play a role in recovery. The focus of the investigation was on the studies performed by Yeung et al. and Dischinger et al. Yeung et al. found no gender differences in
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mortality in Asian and Australian subpopulations, whereas Dischinger et. Al. reported that
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  • Fall '08
  • Tanya Sharon
  • Traumatic brain injury

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