{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

Exam 1 Review Sheet

Exam 1 Review Sheet - ADPR 5710 Exam#1 Review Sheet Baek 1...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–5. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
ADPR 5710 Exam #1 Review Sheet Baek 1. The nature of IMC a. Five Major element of IMC i. Cross-functional ii. Creating and nourishing stakeholder relationships iii. Profitable customer relationships iv. Strategically controlling or influencing all messages v. Encouraging purposeful dialogue b. IMC is an ongoing process i. c. Benefits of IMC i. Helps make your brand stand out from competitors ii. Brings greater accountability iii. Increases brand trust iv. Fosters internal coordination and focus 2. How Consumers Make Decisions (Brand Decision Process) a. Hierarchy of Effect Model i. Persuasion is the act of creating changes in beliefs, attitudes, and behaviors ii. A classic persuasion model is AIDA iii. Identifying four persuasive steps or desired effects that a brand message might have on customers and prospects – attention, interest, desire, and action b. Think – Feel – Do Models i. Brand decision making is partly rational and partly emotional, so brands must speak to both the head and the heart
Image of page 1

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
1. Head: cognitive, rational decision making 2. Heart: experiential, emotional decision making c. The Response Wheel i. d. Types of Brand Decision Process i. Cognitive decision model ii. Experiential decision model iii. Habit/repeat decision model iv. Brand decision can be primarily cognitive or experiential depending on the product category and situation (ex. the level of involvement) 1. High involvement products: cars, computers, etc. 2. Low involvement products: candy bars, toilet paper, etc. e. Three Approaches to Making a Brand Decision
Image of page 2
i. f. Relationship between decision-making and involvement i. g. Basic Brand Decision-Making Steps i. Step 1: Problem and Opportunity Recognition 1. What are needs and wants? 2. Before brand messages can influence customers or prospects, brand messages must first get the attention of these customers and prospects 3. Selective perception is the process used to decide what is worthy of attention ii. Step 2: Information Search 1. During the search for information, customers usually focus on the differences they perceive
Image of page 3

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
among competing brands 2. Brand awareness and brand knowledge are crucial here 3. When customers see marketing communication that is relevant to them, they are more likely to pay attention and think about it iii. Step 3: Evaluation of Choices 1. A cognitive response involves reasoning, judgment, or knowledge 2. For both consumers and businesses, using an evoked set of brands in frequently purchased product categories can greatly simplify the process 3. Fear of making a mistake in the brand decision process a. Financial risk b. Performance risk c. Physical risk d. Psychological risk e. Social risk f. Time-loss risk 4. An affective response involves emotional processing and results in preferring (or not preferring) a brand and developing a conviction about it 5. Companies use the affective approach that tries to use positive and negative feelings iv. Step 4: Behavior and Action 1. Attitudes and behavior are linked, however the links are not always direct or clear 2.
Image of page 4
Image of page 5
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern