Texas Revolution Reader.pdf - TEXAS REVOLUTION...

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TEXAS REVOLUTION READER (1835-1836) QUESTIONNAIRE: 1. According to Santa Anna, why did the Mexican forces need to assault the Alamo? How does the Mexican military victory possibly carry another form of political significance in the eyes of the Mexican government? 2. In comparison, examine the account by Vicente Filisola. How does his analysis of the battle for the Alamo contrast that of Santa Anna? What is his opinion of the war in general and why? 3. How might the Texas Revolution been a conflict of cultures? How might slavery have influenced decisions to pick sides for or against the Texas revolutionaries? 4. Examine the article o f Santa Anna’s denouncement of the institution of slavery. What are Santa Anna’s and his secretary’s stand of the “ cruel and sanguinary ” system of the United States? How does the critique Manifest Destiny as a whole? Connect your discussion to previous class conversations regarding slavery in America during the 19 th century. 5. According to certain Tejano officials, how did the mass immigration Anglos present a threat to the Mexican government? 6. How was the institution of slavery linked to growing differences between the wealthier landowning Tejanos and the government in Mexico City? The Alamo Digital History ID 3662 Author: Carlos E. Castañeda Date: Annotation: Few historical events are more surrounded with legend than the battle of the Alamo, where a couple of hundred Texas volunteers sought to defend an abandoned mission against between two thousand and five thousand Mexican soldiers. Texan bravery and sense of duty in the face of certain defeat has become a popular symbol of heroism.
Most Texans are unaware that Tejanos played a pivotal role in this battle for Texas independence. Gregorio Esparza, Antonio Fuentes, Toribio Losoya, Guadalupe Rodriguez, Juan Seguin, and other Tejanos joined Colonel William B. Travis, who is said to have drawn a line in the dirt with his sword and asked those willing to stay and fight to cross the line. They fought alongside the bedridden Jim Bowie, who later died of a bayonet wound, but not before leaving his famous knife in an attacker's body. And they stood alongside of David Crockett, the fifty- year-old Indian scout and politician, who was either shot and killed or captured and executed. For twelve days, Mexican forces laid siege to the Alamo. At 5 a.m., March 6, 1836, Mexican troops scaled the mission's walls. By 8 a.m., when the fighting was over, 183 defenders lay dead. Two weeks after the defeat at the Alamo, a contingent of Texans surrendered to Mexican forces near Goliad with the understanding that they would be treated as prisoners of war. Instead, Santa Anna ordered more than 350 Texans shot. These defeats had an unexpected side effect. They gave Houston time to raise and train and army. Volunteers from the southern United States flocked to his banner. On April 21, his army surprised and defeated Santa Anna's army as it camped on the San Jacinto River, east of present-day Houston. The next day Houston captured

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