Java Networking (16) - COP 3330: Object-Oriented...

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COP 3330: Java Networking Page 1 © Dr. Mark Llewellyn COP 3330: Object-Oriented Programming Summer 2011 Java Networking Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Computer Science Division University of Central Florida Instructor : Dr. Mark Llewellyn markl@cs.ucf.edu HEC 236, 407-823-2790 http://www.cs.ucf.edu/courses/cop3330/sum2011
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COP 3330: Java Networking Page 2 © Dr. Mark Llewellyn Java Networking • Networking is tightly integrated in Java. The Java API provides the classes for creating sockets to facilitate program communications over the Internet. • Sockets are the endpoints of logical connections between two hosts and can be used to send and receive data. • Java treats socket communication similar to the way it treats I/O operations; thus applications can read from or write to sockets as easily as they can read from or write to files.
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COP 3330: Java Networking Page 3 © Dr. Mark Llewellyn Java Networking The Internet Protocol (IP) is a low-level protocol for delivering data from one computer to another across the Internet in packets. Two higher-level protocols used in conjunction with IP are the Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) and the User Datagram Protocol (UDP). TCP enables two hosts to establish a connection and exchange streams of data. TCP guarantees that all packets sent are delivered in the same order in which they were sent. UDP is a low-overhead, connectionless, host-to-host protocol that allows a datagram to be sent from one host to another. No connection is established and no guarantees are offered.
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COP 3330: Java Networking Page 4 © Dr. Mark Llewellyn Java Networking • Network programming typically involves a server and one or more clients. The client sends requests to the server, and the server responds to those requests. • The client begins by attempting to establish a connection to the server. The server can accept or deny the connection. Once a connection is established, the client and the server communicate through sockets.
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COP 3330: Java Networking Page 5 © Dr. Mark Llewellyn Server Sockets • To establish a server, you need to create a server socket and attach it to a port, which is where the server will listen for connections. • The port identifies the TCP service on the socket. • Port numbers range from 0 to 65536 (2 16 ), but most OS reserve port numbers 0 to 1024 for privileged services. For example, email servers run on port 25, and the Web server usually runs on port 80. • You can choose any port number that is not currently used by any other process.
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COP 3330: Java Networking Page 6 © Dr. Mark Llewellyn Server Sockets • The following statement creates a server socket named serverSocket : ServerSocket serverSocket = new ServerSocket(portNumber); Example: ServerSocket server = new ServerSocket(8000); • Attempting to create a server socket on a port already in use would cause a java.net.BindException.
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COP 3330: Java Networking Page 7 © Dr. Mark Llewellyn Server Sockets • Once a server socket is created, the server can use the following statement to listen for connection attempts: Socket socket = ServerSocket.accept();
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This note was uploaded on 09/21/2011 for the course COP 3330 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '08 term at University of Central Florida.

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Java Networking (16) - COP 3330: Object-Oriented...

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