CGS3175_0_Intro - Introduction: History of HTML & XHTML...

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Computer Science Department University of Central Florida Introduction: History of HTML & XHTML COP 3175 – Internet Applications
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Introduction: page 2 © Jonathan Cazalas Objectives Learn the history of the Web and HTML Understand HTML standards and specifications Understand HTML elements and markup tags Tools for Creating Web pages
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Introduction: page 3 © Jonathan Cazalas Exploring the History of the World Wide Web A network is a structure linking computers together for the purpose of sharing information and services Users typically access a network through a computer called a host or node A node that provides information or a service is called a server
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Introduction: page 4 © Jonathan Cazalas Exploring the History of the World Wide Web A computer or other device that requests services from a server is called a client One of the most commonly used designs is the client-server network If the computers that make up a network are close together (within a single department or building), then the network is referred to as a local area network (LAN)
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Introduction: page 5 © Jonathan Cazalas Exploring the History of the World Wide Web A network that covers a wide area, such as several buildings or cities, is called a wide area network (WAN) The largest WAN in existence is the Internet In its early days, the Internet was called ARPANET and consisted of two network nodes located at UCLA and Stanford, connected by a phone line
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Introduction: page 6 © Jonathan Cazalas Exploring the History of the World Wide Web Today the Internet has grown to include an uncountable number of nodes involving computers, cell phones, PDAs, MP3 players, gaming systems, and television stations The physical structure of the Internet uses fiber-optic cables, satellites, phone lines, wireless access points, and other telecommunications media
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Introduction: page 7 © Jonathan Cazalas Structure of the Internet
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Introduction: page 8 © Jonathan Cazalas Exploring the History of the World Wide Web Timothy Berners-Lee and other researchers at the CERN nuclear research facility near Geneva, Switzerland laid the foundations for the World Wide Web , or the Web , in 1989 (Just don’t tell Al Gore that!) They developed a system of interconnected hypertext documents that allowed their users to easily navigate from one topic to another Hypertext is a method of organizing information that gives the reader control over the order in which the information is presented
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Introduction: page 9 © Jonathan Cazalas Hypertext Documents When you read a book, you follow a linear progression, reading one page after another With hypertext, you progress through pages in whatever way is best suited to you and your objectives Hypertext lets you skip from one topic to another
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This note was uploaded on 09/21/2011 for the course CGS 3175 taught by Professor Cazales during the Fall '11 term at University of Central Florida.

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CGS3175_0_Intro - Introduction: History of HTML & XHTML...

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