Chapter%201

Chapter%201 - PHYSICS, Part I PHY 2053C, SECTION 0001;...

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PHYSICS, Part I PHY 2053C, SECTION 0001; MoWeFr 3:30- 4:20 PM MAP 260 Instructor: Suren A. Tatulian Associate Professor Dept. of Physics University of Central Florida Office: Physical Sciences, Room 456 Office hrs.: MoWeFr 10:30-11:30 AM or by appointments statulia@mail.ucf.edu
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Homework will be assigned online at http://www.webassign.net Self-enroll using the Class Key: ucf 6896 9455 Syllabus is loaded to myUCF/Online Course Tools/Webcourses@UCF Mid-term exams 40% total (20% each of three exams, with one dropped) Final exam 25% Quizzes 12% Homework 13% Laboratory 10% Class components: Weekly (unannounced) quizzes Three midterm exams, one with the lowest grade dropped You are allowed to take only two of the three midterm exams A final comprehensive exam Homework Lab No i-clicker will be used in this section.
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Chapter 1: Introduction and Mathematical Concepts 1. The Nature of Physics 2. Units 3. The Role of Units in Problem Solving 4. Trigonometry 5. Scalars and Vectors 6. Vector Addition and Subtraction 7. The Components of a Vector
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Patterns and principles that relate the phenomena of Nature are called physical theories . Many, or at least some, of these theories are not absolutely correct, i.e., they are approximations to a certain degree. Those theories that are believed to be solidly confirmed by all existing experimental evidence are called physical laws . PHYSICS IS THE STUDY OF NATURE, AND NATURE IS EVERYTHING
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In order to test the validity of a theory, we do experiments . In most cases the experiments are done on physical models . Models are simplified versions of a physical system. When we choose a model, it is crucial to use good judgment and not to simplify the system too much. MODELS Often we use idealized models . Here only the most critical parameters of the objects are taken into account and the secondary parameters are neglected. For example, we use definitions like a point mass, a point charge, a rigid body, an absolute insulator , etc. A real system An idealized model
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A realistic biological system. A cell membrane, containing regular lipids, glycolipids, integral and peripheral proteins, water, and hundreds of compounds dissolved in it. An idealized model. Only regular lipids and water are left. Water is considered as a continuum, with a constant dielectric constant of 80, the membrane is considered a continuum with a dielectric constant of 2.
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UNITS Any number that is used to describe an observation of a physical phenomenon quantitatively is called a physical quantity . Some physical quantities (e.g., space and time) are so fundamental that they can be defined only by describing how to measure them. Such definitions are called operational definitions . Other quantities can be calculated from those that can be measured (e.g., the average speed = distance/time) d t 1 t 2 If d = 300 meters and t 2 t 1 = 20 seconds, then average speed = 15 m/s
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Physical quantities are measured in certain units . Examples from preceding slide.
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Chapter%201 - PHYSICS, Part I PHY 2053C, SECTION 0001;...

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