Circulatory System

Circulatory System - 1. Circulatory System a. Accepts...

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1. Circulatory System a. Accepts oxygen, nutrients, and other substances from the respiratory and digestive systems and delivers them to cells. b. Accepts carbon dioxide and wastes from cells and delivers them to respiratory and urinary systems for disposal. c. Cardiovascular i. Greek work kardia means heart ii. Latin word vasculum means vessel d. Rate and volume of flow can adjusted as conditions in the body vary. e. For example, the bareceptor reflex monitors short-term changes in arterial blood pressure. i. Baroreceptors in carotid arteries and aortic arch send signal to the CNS to control bp. f. In additional, the circulatory system is linked to the lymphatic system. Small amounts of fluid leak out, and are returned to the circulatory systems. 2. Cardiovascular System includes: a. Heart b. Blood vessels i. Arteries ii. Arterioles iii. Capillaries iv. Venules v. Veins 3. Location of the Heart
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a. Heart is about the size of a fist. b. Lies in thoracic cavity. c. Enclosed in a protective sac – pericardium (around) 4. Layers of Heart Wall a. Inner layer of the pericardium is the outer layer of heart wall. b. Beneath pericardium is the myocardium , the think cardiac muscle tissue. c. The outermost later of the myocardium is the epicardium. d. Thin endocardium lines the chambers of the heart and blood vessels (inner-most layer of myocardium ). 5. Heart Structure a. Each side has two chambers: i. Upper atrium ii. Lower ventricle b. Valves between atria and ventricles. Tricuspid valve (right side of heart) Mitral valve (left side of heart) 6. Bacterial Endocarditis a. Endocarditis is an inflammation of the inner layer of the heart, the endocaardium. b. It usually involves the heart valves. Infection of the mitral vavle. c. Infections of the mitral valve. d. Rehematic fever – strep bacteria for example. 7. Heart
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a. The heart is two side by side pumps. b. Separated by a wall known as a septum . c. The human heart has four distinct chambers – two atria and two ventricles. d. Left ventricle pumps blood into the aorta, and so the left ventricle is larger than the right ventricle of the heart. 8. Heart Valves 9. Cardiac Cycle a. Contraction phase is systole . b. Relaxation phase is diastole . 10. Blood flow in the heart a. In a heartbeat, the heart’s chambers contract and relax. b. Contraction phase is systole, and relaxation phase in diastole. c. The sequence of muscle contraction and relaxation is a cardiac cycle. d. During the cycle: i. The ventricles relax before the atria contract (end). ii. Atria contract – SA node fires. iii. Then the ventricles contract when the atria relax. iv. When the relaxed atria are filling with blood, the fluid pressure inside them rises, and the AV valves open. 11.
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This note was uploaded on 09/22/2011 for the course BIO 101 taught by Professor Smutzer during the Fall '10 term at Temple.

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Circulatory System - 1. Circulatory System a. Accepts...

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