Thompson Exclusion PIC's bad

Thompson Exclusion PIC's bad - If one debater is allowed...

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Exclusion PIC’s bad A. Interpretation: The negative advocacy must be exclusive from the affirmative advocacy. B. Violation: My opponent runs a counter plan that is inclusive to the affirmative advocacy. C. Standards: 1. Predictability There are an infinite number of tiny changes that you can make to my advocacy and call it a PIC. Thus I can never predict the violation. This is unfair because it explodes my research burden as I must be prepared to defend the desirability in full any tiny change to my plan. 2. Ground The affirmative loses all their ground because as long as the negative can find any one part of the plan that is undesirable he/she may only attack that however the affirmative then loses all ability to develop substantive answers to the PIC as it is essentially my advocacy. Ground is key to fairness because it determines the arguments that we are allowed to make and defend.
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Unformatted text preview: If one debater is allowed more ability to make arguments than the other, it is unfair because they have an arbitrary advantage in the round. 3. Time skew A PIC skews affirmative ground as they are advocating the affirmative plan minus a few tiny parts. The implication is that they are able to sever out of 99% of the A.C. benefits that dont apply to the negatives tiny advocacy thus removing any meaning from the time I needed to invest writing and reading those advocacies. This is unfair because it takes away nearly six minutes of my time to make arguments to defend my advocacy. In debate, the amount of time that we are able to spend on each argument influences our ability to attack and defend them. When one debater has more time than another, that debater has an unfair ability to make more and better answers....
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This note was uploaded on 09/21/2011 for the course ECONOMICS 302 taught by Professor Wayne during the Spring '11 term at Wayne State University.

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