lawresearch - A RESEARCH GUIDE FOR LAW STUDENTS AND...

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A RESEARCH GUIDE FOR LAW STUDENTS AND BEGINNING ATTORNEYS }}}} 2003 GABRIEL AND MATILDA BARNETT INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY CENTER AND THE ASA V. CALL LAW LIBRARY UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA LAW SCHOOL
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TABLE OF CONTENTS PREFACE . .......................................................................... 1 RESEARCH METHODOLOGY: SUGGESTED STRATEGY . .................................. 2 FINDING TOOLS FOR SECONDARY SOURCES . .......................................... 6 LEGAL RESEARCH GUIDES . .......................................................... 8 LEGAL RESEARCH ON THE INTERNET . ............................................... 11
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1 PREFACE This guide is divided into four sections. In the first section, we have provided you with a suggested outline approach to the legal research problems you likely will encounter in your legal career. What we want to suggest to you is that legal research often follows the same basic process regardless of the type of problems which you may encounter. What will vary will be the chief sources you will consult, the resources which will be available to you, and the time and financial constraints for your research. If you have developed a strong methodological approach to legal research of the type we advocate herein, any variance in the time and resources available will not be problematic for you. If, from the start, you begin your legal research by using the approach we suggest on the following pages, your research should be efficient and fruitful, leaving you more time to devote to analysis and writing. In the second section of this guide, we discuss and list various finding tools that can be used to help you identify and locate secondary sources pertaining to a particular topic. Section three of this guide lists a variety of other legal research guides that you may wish to refer to if you have questions about specific legal research sources and strategies. The legal research guides listed in that section may be helpful if you are researching in either general or specialized areas of the law (prime examples of specialized legal research being tax law research and compiling a legislative history). The final section of this guide discusses some important considerations when doing web-based legal research and lists some major websites that often serve as good starting points when doing legal research on the web. Given that there are no added costs associated with most of these legal websites, they may prove as worthwhile alternatives to the more costly, though complete, Lexis and Westlaw services. When starting out at a new workplace, it is critical that you familiarize yourself
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This note was uploaded on 09/22/2011 for the course LAW LAW taught by Professor Concordia during the Spring '11 term at Concordia AB.

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lawresearch - A RESEARCH GUIDE FOR LAW STUDENTS AND...

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