WivesandMasters - B Women in Lyon’s industry 1789...

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9/21/11 Wives and Masters Did technological changes affect personal life? Production has always been a matter of per- sonal life.
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9/21/11 Wives and Masters I. The family model II. Wives and women’s work III. Changing status
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9/21/11 Wives and Masters I. The family model A. the workshop & the household -- master as father -- master-servant law, English common law -- both technical and moral authority -- silk weavers guilds
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9/21/11 Wives and Masters I. The family model B. The guild model -- main craft organization until 18C -- confraternities: forerunner of corpora- tions, patents, trademarks -- lifetime progression -- apprentice, craftsman, journeyman,
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9/21/11 Wives and Masters II. Wives and women’s work -- silk industry of pre-industrial Lyon, before 1791 A. Setting up shop -- dowries as start-up funds -- household management -- skilled or unskilled work? -- holding the license
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9/21/11
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9/21/11
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9/21/11
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9/21/11 Wives and Masters II. Wives and women’s work
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Unformatted text preview: B. Women in Lyon’s industry-- 1789: population 143,000-- 25% population in silk industry-- 68% silk workers female-- tasks-- unwinding cocoon; cleaning, drawing 9/21/11 Wives and Masters II. Wives and women’s work C. Working at home-- 1788: avg workshop had 2.4 looms-- wives “sat at the loom”-- workshop usually one single room-- children farmed out-- wet nurse a standard expense-- 60% children died by age 6 ½ 9/21/11 Wives and Masters III. Changing status A.Masters vs. merchants-- 1737-- masters could sell-- wives could weave outside home-- 1744-- wives prohibited from outside weaving 9/21/11 Wives and Masters III. Changing status B. The moral economy of work-- overwork-- “the fathers of families, them, their wives and their children, [now] work sev-enteen to eighteen hours a day, [and are] unable to earn enough without public char-ity”...
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This note was uploaded on 09/21/2011 for the course HSCI 1715 taught by Professor Alexander during the Spring '11 term at University of Minnesota Crookston.

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WivesandMasters - B Women in Lyon’s industry 1789...

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