World War 2 Final_Conner G.docx - Conner Gregerson HIST 4130 Dr Karch December 9 2019 HIST 4130 Final America\u2019s main contribution to World War II was

World War 2 Final_Conner G.docx - Conner Gregerson HIST...

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Conner Gregerson HIST 4130 Dr. Karch December 9, 2019 HIST 4130 Final America’s main contribution to World War II was its ability to boast its economic power, which directly correlated to military success. At the time of World War II’s inception, Europe laid in shambles both physically and economically. World War I had ruined many countries landscapes, depleted their economies, and left a continental wide depression. These factors helped Germany take advantage of their situation and rebuild without interference as the rest of Europe was trying to rebuild. When Germany started its imperial conquest over the continent, many countries weren’t ready for the fight as the outcome of swift defeat reflected their economic and military inferiority to Germany and its allies. Before the United States began involvement in the war, Germany’s reign over the continent appeared almost inevitable. The consistent annexation of new territories gave the German military more access to resources, which consequently cut off access to resources for other countries who opposed German expansion. To fully understand the impact that the United States had on the war, it must be observed that they radically increased the allied armament numbers. Production of supplies, weapons and ammo, and vehicles had become Americas main focus back home once they decided to join the war effort. Major companies like Ford found themselves lifted out of crisis from the Great Depression when they began to make aircrafts, tanks, and other vehicles for the
allied nations. The numbers in productions are bolstering as “American industry provided almost two-thirds of all the Allied military equipment produced during the war” and “in four years American industrial production, already the world’s largest, doubled in size” (Richard Overy, Why the Allies Won ). With a staggering increase in military resource numbers along with the inclusion of American soldiers, the weakened allied forces had a newfound chance to win the war. The abundance of resources allowed for the United States to send soldiers and resources over to Europe, as well as open up the Pacific Front. In doing so, the Japanese were no longer a potential aid for Germany, the German army now had a legitimate threat from the west, and their forces were spread thin. Economics have proven over time to be a driving force in war success and the United States helped do just that with their economic power. All on its own, the United States more than doubled the allied combined GDP during the war. In 1941, the combined GDP of Russia and Britain was $703 billion whereas the United States GDP was $1.499 trillion. These numbers

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