WGS_160_F_2011_8

WGS_160_F_2011_8 - ConstructionofaNational Manhood:

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Construction of a National  Manhood: Abolition and Black Masculinity
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Abolition: The first “civil rights” movement in the U.S. Set the groundwork for future activism around  gender, sexuality, etc. for other oppressed  groups. Tactics: Appealing to wealthy educated  whites, advocating Christian morals, referring  to the Dec. of Independence and the  Constitution, emphasizing the humanity and  “manhood” of the enslaved.  
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Frederick Douglass Famous writer and advocate for abolition and women’s suffrage Dual vision for gender and race-based justices came out of plantation life Stressed the importance of literacy Opposed secession of New England from the U.S.(would not end slavery in South) Favored direct resistance over electoral politics and gradualism (similar to suffragists who won the right to vote) Attended 1848 Seneca Falls Women’s Suffrage Convention Used Christianity to argue against slavery
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This note was uploaded on 09/23/2011 for the course WGS 160 taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '11 term at S.F. State.

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WGS_160_F_2011_8 - ConstructionofaNational Manhood:

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