Lecture 4 Social Stratification Part 2

Lecture 4 Social Stratification Part 2 - 20:08 o

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Social Stratification Part 2 20:08 Kingsley Davis and Wilbert Moore Stratification is a functional necessity and a source of social order. o Societies insure that the most important positions are conscientiously filled  by the most qualified persons Why different positions carry different degrees of prestige? o Motivate people to fill certain positions: rewards (money, prestige) o Motivate people to perform the duties Critical response to Davis and Moore by Melvin Tumin (255) Social stratification systems (SSS) functions to limit the discovery of the full  range of talent SSS provides elite with the political power necessary that rationalizes the  status quo as logical and natural SSS limits social integration by encouraging hostility and distrust More limitations of Structural Functionalist theory Highly paid positions are not functionally important o Oprah winfrey 275 mil o 50 cent 150 mil o tiger woods 100 mil o yes these people provide us with a recreational release and they do have  special skills, but are they more necessary to society than the people that  pick up trash Even more limitations of structural-functionalist theory Conflict View of Stratification Stratification is neither a societal necessity nor a source of social order Stratification is a primary source of conflict and unhappiness Those in the top of the stratification control the resources (money, education,  housing, health care, and land).  They set the rules.  They serve the interest  of those at the top and NOT the survival needs of the society. Class Divisions Upper class – some sociologists define as the highest earning 5% of the US  population Middle class – roughtly 45% of the population, likely to be college educated Working class – about 35% of the population, industrial/factory workers, farm  and manual laborers
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