rhetoricalanalysis

Rhetoricalanalysis - W Whatisrhetoric Rhetoric is the study of the techniques and rules for using language effectively and persuasively

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Writing a Rhetorical Analysis What is rhetoric? Rhetoric is the study of the techniques and rules for using language effectively and persuasively. Rhetoricians analyze and evaluate what works and what does not work in a specific text and consider how a text is created, how it interacts with the reader, and what features make it effective or ineffective. What is a rhetorical analysis? A rhetorical analysis provides you the opportunity to practice critical and analytical reading, thinking and writing skills. When you are asked to do a "rhetorical analysis" of a text, you are being asked to apply your critical reading skills to break down the "whole" of the text into the sum of its "parts." A rhetorical analysis involves explaining what you think the text’s argument is, and then—more importantly—showing how the text attempts to persuade or convince you. You determine what the writer is trying to achieve and what writing strategies he/she is using to achieve it. Then you determine whether or not the writer is successful. In a rhetorical analysis you don’t just describe the writer’s strategies. Instead you show how the strategies used in an argument actually make it succeed or fail. You must quote and/or paraphrase from the original text to show where and why an argument makes sense and where it seems to fall apart. If an argument startles, challenges, insults and/or lulls, explain precisely why and provide evidence. Your rhetorical analysis essentially becomes your argument regarding the original writer’s argument. A rhetorical analysis requires that you critique and analyze both the content and style of the reading. You will discuss how the text is constructed, what rhetorical strategies it employs, and how effectively its argument is supported. Consider both strengths and weaknesses. Whether you agree or disagree with an argument doesn’t matter in a rhetorical analysis. Instead, the focus here is on how the argument works or doesn’t work. Keep your distance as you write a rhetorical analysis. The fastest way to fail a rhetorical analysis is by writing a summary or an editorial. No tangents or rants are acceptable in this assignment. The focus is on the text, not on your position. Analyze text in present tense. What are some of the strategies  I might analyze in my rhetorical analysis? Purpose and audience First, consider the author’s purpose by determining what the writer is trying to accomplish in this piece. What does the author want to achieve? Some of the more common purposes include: to explain, inform, persuade, entertain, motivate, question, etc. Identify the strategies the author utilizes to accomplish the purpose, for
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This note was uploaded on 09/23/2011 for the course ENGL 1113 taught by Professor Brown during the Fall '08 term at Oklahoma State.

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Rhetoricalanalysis - W Whatisrhetoric Rhetoric is the study of the techniques and rules for using language effectively and persuasively

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