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williamseditorial - Fraud in Academia By Walter Williams...

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Unformatted text preview: Fraud in Academia By Walter Williams Editorial, Oklahoman, May 6, 2009, p. 9A Soon college students will come home and present parents with their grades. To avoid delusion, parents should do some serious discounting because of rampant grade inflation. If grade inflation continues, a college bachelor's degree will have just as much credibility as a high school diploma. Writing for the National Association of Scholars, Professor Thomas C. Reeves documents what is no less than academic fraud in his article "The Happy Classroom: Grade Inflation Works." From 1991 to 2007, in public institutions, the average grade point average (GPA) rose, on a four-point scale, from 2.93 to 3.11. In private schools, the average GPA climbed from 3.09 to 3.30. Put within a historical perspective, in the 1930s, the average GPA was 2.35 (about a C-plus); whereby now it's a B-plus. Academic fraud is rife at many of the nation's most prestigious and costliest universities. At Brown University, two- thirds of all letter grades given are A's. At Harvard, 50 percent of all grades were either A or A- (up from 22 percent thirds of all letter grades given are A's....
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This note was uploaded on 09/23/2011 for the course ENGL 1113 taught by Professor Brown during the Fall '08 term at Oklahoma State.

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