Ophthalmic and Otic Disorders L.docx - Ophthalmic and Otic Disorders L.O.\u2019s Identify the types of ophthalmic disorders that warrant pharmacological

Ophthalmic and Otic Disorders L.docx - Ophthalmic and Otic...

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Ophthalmic and Otic Disorders L.O.’s Identify the types of ophthalmic disorders that warrant pharmacological treatment Dry eye Disease Symptoms: White or red eye Sandy/gritty feeling, Sensation of object in eye Excessive tearing Causes Lid or corneal defects Sjogrens syndrome, Bell’s Palsy, or thyroid disorders Aging Loss of tissue turgor Medications Antihistamines, antidepressants, decongestants, diuretics, beta blockers Allergens Dust Heating/Ac resulting in reduction of humidity Allergic Conjunctivitis Symptoms red eye, watery d/c, itchy eyes Causes: Pollen Animal dander Topical eye preparations Dust Other environmental factors Corneal Edema Symptoms
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Swelling in the corneal, halos, starbursts around light **Must be diagnosed by Dr. First before recommending OTC tx Causes Over-wearing contacts Surgical damage Corneal dystrophies Loose Foreign object in eye Symptoms excessive tearing, feeling of particle in eye Exclusions If object causes significant irritation or abrasion on eye surface Foreign object is a piece of metal or wood Minor eye irritation Symptoms redness of the eye, pain, feeling of “sand in eye” Causes: Contact lens Exposure to wind Sun Smog Chemical fumes Chlorine “Snow blindness” Contact dermatitis skin irritation and inflammation of the eyelids Symptoms swelling, scaling, redness of eyelid, profuse itching Causes Allergens Irritants Cosmetics Soaps
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Eye medications Foreign Objects Chemical burns Exclusions to Self-Care (Ophthalmic) Blunt trauma Foreign particles trapped/embedded in eye Metal and/or wood particles in eye Ocular abrasions Infections of eyelid/eye surface Eye exposure to chemicals Thermal injury Viral conjunctivitis Bacterial or chlamydial conjunctivitis Recommend appropriate pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatment options when given a case Dry Eye Treatments o Non-pharmacological Environmental modifications Wearing glasses/eye protection Eliminating offending agents Warm compresses Good eyelid hygiene o Pharmacological Ocular lubricants solutions, ointments, or gels MOA: lubricates the eye surface, stabilizes the tear film, protects corneal and conjunctive cells, and reduces tear evaporation Excipients buffering agents Solutions ”artificial tears” o Dosing: usually 1-2 drops in affected eye once to twice daily PRN may increase up to 3-4x/day o Active ingredients Hydroxypropyl methylcellulose Glycerin
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  • Spring '17
  • Ophthalmology, Earwax, eye irritation,  Ointments

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