mgf1107lecture4 - MGF 1107 EXPLORATIONS IN MATHEMATICS...

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MGF 1107 – EXPLORATIONS IN MATHEMATICS LECTURE 4 Chapter 2 – The Mathematics of Power In chapter 1 we looked at voting, with the implicit assumption that each person casts one vote. However in the real world this is often not the case, especially when the voters are institutions rather than individuals. Ex. In the 2008 Presidential election, Barack Obama gained electoral votes for winning Florida, but only for winning Vermont, so Florida has more power than Vermont when it comes to determining who becomes President. Ex. For a resolution to pass at the United Nations, all five of the permanent members – must agree, regardless of the wishes of the other countries. They hence have more power than the others. These two examples illustrate the concept of weighted voting , which we will look at in more detail, studying the different ways to define the power of each voter. Definitions and Notation Definition: A weighted voting system is one where voters are not necessarily equal in terms of the number of votes that they cast. Definition:
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This note was uploaded on 09/22/2011 for the course MAC 2311 taught by Professor Evinson during the Spring '08 term at University of Central Florida.

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mgf1107lecture4 - MGF 1107 EXPLORATIONS IN MATHEMATICS...

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