mgf1107lecture5 - MGF 1107 EXPLORATIONS IN MATHEMATICS...

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MGF 1107 – EXPLORATIONS IN MATHEMATICS LECTURE 5 Ex. In the British parliament there are 647 members, most of whom (we will assume all) are divided among the three main parties: the Conservative Party, the Labour Party, and the Liberal Democrats. Consequently votes are needed to pass a motion, and it is not often that members vote against the wishes of their party’s leader. So consider a general election whereby the results are as follows: P 1 : Conservatives P 2 : Labour P 3 : Liberal Democrats This can be represented as In this instance, no single party has enough votes by themselves to pass a motion, and so while the Liberal Democrats have the fewest number of seats, they have a lot of power, since by forming a coalition with one of the other parties, they can cause a motion to pass or fail. Definition: A coalition describes any set of players who join together to vote the same way. A winning coalition has enough votes to cause a motion to pass, whereas a losing coalition does not. Definition:
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This note was uploaded on 09/22/2011 for the course MAC 2311 taught by Professor Evinson during the Spring '08 term at University of Central Florida.

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mgf1107lecture5 - MGF 1107 EXPLORATIONS IN MATHEMATICS...

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