Chapter 5 - Chapter 5 Higher Functional Systems I. Memory...

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Chapter 5 Higher Functional Systems I. Memory Systems Memory forms the basis of experience and perceptions of self It is dynamic and malleable It allows people to travel back in time Memory pervades most aspects of human experience So it is necessary foundation of social communication When memory is working fluidly, there is little need to notice it It is scary to imagine walking up not knowing who you are, who your friends are, and what has happened in your life. Memory is parceled into subsystems based on ideas of storage and processing Memory is a “fragile” system, affected by many disorders, including most of the dementias, such as Alzheimer’s disease, toxic conditions, loss of oxygen, and head injury Anterograde amnesia** is the loss of the ability to encode and learn new information after a defined event (such as a head injury, lesion, or disease onset). Retrograde amnesia is the loss of old memories from before an event or illness II. A Framework for Conceptualizing Memory Psychology textbooks typically describe memory as having three main divisions; sensory
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Chapter 5 - Chapter 5 Higher Functional Systems I. Memory...

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