ch05 - Chapter5:SensationandPerception

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Chapter 5: Sensation and Perception The study of how we gather and understand sensory  information.
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Chapter Outline 1. Common Process of Sensation and Perception 1. The Chemical Senses: Smell and Taste 1. The Tactile Senses: Touch, Pressure, Pain, Vibration                                                                                                                      1. The Auditory Sense: Hearing
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Basic Definitions Sensation  – Process of receiving raw  sensory data and sending  that data to the brain. Perception-   Process of selecting,  organizing, and making  sense of that data.           Raw Sensory Data  Vision           Light waves  Hearing        Sound waves  Smell            Air borne chemicals  Taste             Food chemicals  Touch           Pressure
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What do we need to do to the raw sensory data so  that our brain can understand it? Transduction-  The process of turning raw sensory  data into a neural impulse that our brain can read.
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Transduction Made Easy Step 1:  Sensory receptor cells , located in the eyes,  ears, nose, tongue, and skin convert raw sensory data  into neural impulses. Step 2: Sensory neurons then send these neural  impulses to the brain to be processed. 
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Thresholds: Testing the Limits Absolute Threshold is the smallest amount of a  stimulus that one can detect. For example, what is the dimmest light you can see? Difference threshold (or JND)- the minimal difference  needed to notice a difference between two stimuli  For example, when you can perceive a difference in change of  volume in your ear?
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Sensory Adaptation     Constant stimulation decreases the number of sensory  messages sent to the brain which causes decreased sensation.    (why? We can’t afford to waste attention to unchanging  stimuli) Examples: This is why a crying baby will wake us, but not a thunder storm which might  be even louder. This is why you notice how tight your pants are when you first put them on  but over the course of the day they seem loser (you don’t register the  sensation of the tightness). This is why you do not notice how much perfume you put on.  At first it  seems good but then you do not smell it so you put on more and more…. .
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Perception 101 Bottom-up processing- The raw sensory data is sent  to the brain and your brain uses all of that data to 
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ch05 - Chapter5:SensationandPerception

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