- ERDS COME OF AGE 1 Electronic Reading Devices(ERDs Come of Age William Lambarde COMM 130 Research Paper February 4 2011 ERDS COME OF AGE 2

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ERDS COME OF AGE 1 Electronic Reading Devices (ERDs) Come of Age William Lambarde COMM 130: Research Paper February 4, 2011
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ERDS COME OF AGE 2 Electronic Reading Devices (ERDs) Come of Age The 2010 sales figures for ebooks show that these products can now compete financially with their much older print counterparts. Amazon, which has thrived as a print book vendor operating on the Web (http://www.amazon.com), reported far more ebook sales for its Kindle reader than hardcover sales (Duglin Kennedy, p. 15). For brick-and-mortar Barnes and Nobles, the ebook sales for its NOOK reader represented the brightest part of 2010 financial reports (“Barnes & Nobles,” 2010). Apple, finally, on the same day it released its iPad, also delivered to new owners 250,000 ebooks from its online store (“Apple Announces” 2010). Given that ebooks have been available since the 1970s, albeit mostly for free or niche purposes (Stafford, 2002, p. 22), their newfound ability to generate significant revenue from mainstream readers appears connected to recent developments in portable ERDs, especially their improved connectivity and compatibility with a large pool of downloadable, low-cost—but current—titles. Early Portable Ebooks Although most first-time purchasers of ebook titles are probably also making their first acquisitions of specialized reading devices, Dearnley and McKnight (2001) have noted that “portable Electronic books have been produced since 1998.” (p. 66) By the turn of the millennium, in fact, the offerings of portable readers included both a variety of specialized ERDs and a growing number of personal digital assistants (PDAs) equipped with ebook software. Writing in 2002, Steve Grant identified “two handheld devices truly suited for serious ebook reading”: (a) the REB 1200, “a handheld ebook”; and (b) the goReader Tablet PC, which was “3- ring binder size,” seemingly “a PDA on steroids”   (p. 52). Also in the early 2000s, other portable electronic reading options became available. Palm Computer, a popular PDA maker, established Palm Digital Media to distribute ebooks for its Palm OS (Reid, 2002a). Microsoft, while not
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ERDS COME OF AGE 3 producing its own device, provided a version of its Microsoft Reader for Pocket PCs made by partnering hardware vendors (Stafford, 2002, p. 22). Adobe, finally, provided its own version of ebook reading software for Pocket PCs (Dearnley and McKnight, 2001, p. 66) and, like Palm, started its own ebook distribution unit, which was called Adobe Digital Media (Peek, 2005, p. 18). The growing sales of ebooks for these platforms (“E-Book sales,” 2003) seemed to support
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This note was uploaded on 09/22/2011 for the course BUSINESS 101 taught by Professor Tate during the Spring '10 term at Columbus State Community College.

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- ERDS COME OF AGE 1 Electronic Reading Devices(ERDs Come of Age William Lambarde COMM 130 Research Paper February 4 2011 ERDS COME OF AGE 2

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