Arsenals of Folly Summaries

Arsenals of Folly Summaries - Arsenals of Folly Summaries...

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Arsenals of Folly Summaries Watering of Authority   David Litteral  Dec 3, 2010 9:04 PM  Immediately following World War II the strategy and implementation of war was usurped by civilian leadership because of the capacity of nuclear weapons to affect the entire world. Politicians felt this was too great of a responsibility to leave in the hands of soldiers. The Goldwater-Nichols Act established the importance of the military leadership of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. After WW II they were staff officers. After the GNA they became the National Command Authority with greater executive authority. Re: Civilian Controls   TC Jennings  Dec 8, 2010 7:26 PM  i dont think a general will ever be able to make a call like pushing the  red button without presidential or congressional consent and the United  Nation's consent. There are too many people who dont want the fate of  the world in the hands of any one man.  <<< Replied to message below >>> Authored by: David Litteral Authored on: Dec 5, 2010 6:51 PM Subject: Re: Civilian Controls The generals lost executive authority after WWII. It wasn't until the  Goldwater-Nichols Act that they regained it as the National Command  Authority.  <<< Replied to message below >>> Authored by: Thomas Lennemann Authored on: Dec 5, 2010 2:21 PM Subject: Re: Civilian Controls
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Yes, as far as the American side.  The development of the "Football",  where only the President has the launch codes, bears this out.  I  remember reading "Thirteen Days" by Robert Kennedy, there was  discussion as to whether the missiles in Cuba were controlled by the  commanders on the ground.  <<< Replied to message below >>> Authored by: Arthur Coumbe Authored on: Dec 5, 2010 12:33 PM Subject: Re: Civilian Controls  Tom -- So was strategy taken out of the hands of the generals?  <<< Replied to message below >>> Authored by: Thomas Lennemann Authored on: Dec 4, 2010 5:08 PM Subject: Civilian Controls Rhodes describes how Truman was shaken by the civilian casualties  following Hiroshima.  He began to think, "[He]. ..did not propose to have  some dashing lieutenant colonel decide when would be the proper time  to drop one." (Rhodes, 78)  To add furthur civilian control, Truman later  proposed international control over nuclear weapons through the United  Nations.  Truman was correct   Robert Coombs  Dec 5, 2010 9:33 PM  Truman said it best when he stated, “[I don’t want] to have some dashing lieutenant colonel [to] decide when would be the proper time to drop one.” Nuclear weapon capability was feared to be too great of a temptation in the hands of the military. With the development of low yield tactical nuclear missiles, even small artillery nukes could have
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sparked a war that could have engulfed both continents. The Atomic Energy Act of 1946
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Arsenals of Folly Summaries - Arsenals of Folly Summaries...

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