Wk 1 Lec 2s

Wk 1 Lec 2s - Chapter3 TheMoleculesofLife Allthatturkey

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–10. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Chapter 3 The Molecules of Life
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
All that turkey
Background image of page 2
Organic molecules:  The all important carbon A cell is mostly water, but the rest of the  cell consists mostly of  carbon-based  molecules . Carbon is a versatile atom. It has   4   electrons in an outer shell that holds  eight. Carbon can share its electrons with other  atoms to form up to           4 covalent bonds . Carbon can use its bonds to Attach to other carbons. Form an endless diversity of carbon skeletons.
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Organic molecules:  The all important carbon
Background image of page 4
Organic molecules:  The all important carbon The simplest organic compounds are hydrocarbons. These are organic molecules containing only  carbon  and  hydrogen  atoms. The simplest hydrocarbon is  methane . The  hydrocarbons of fat molecules provide energy for our  bodies .
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Organic molecules: The all important carbon Each type of organic molecule has a  unique 3-D  shape that defines its function  in an organism. The molecules of your body recognize one another  based on their shapes. The unique properties of an organic compound  depend not only on its carbon skeleton but also  on the  atoms attached to the skeleton . These atoms are called functional groups .
Background image of page 6
Giant molecules from smaller building blocks On a molecular scale, many of life’s molecules are gigantic. Biologists call them  macromolecules Examples: DNA, carbohydrates Most macromolecules are  polymers . Polymers are made by stringing together many  smaller molecules  called monomers Cells link monomers by  dehydration reactions .
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Organisms also have to break down macromolecules. Cells do this by a process called  hydrolysis Giant molecules from smaller building blocks
Background image of page 8
Biological Molecules:  Carbohydrates Carbohydrates include small sugar  molecules in soft drinks and long starch  molecules in pasta and potatoes  Monosaccharides Monosaccharides are simple sugars Glucose  is found in sports drinks. Fructose
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 10
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 26

Wk 1 Lec 2s - Chapter3 TheMoleculesofLife Allthatturkey

This preview shows document pages 1 - 10. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online