Wk 2 Lec 2s

Wk 2 Lec 2s - Chapter6 Respiration:...

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Chapter 6 Respiration: Harvesting Chemical energy from Food
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Feeling the Burn When we exercise, our muscles need energy in order to perform work. Our cells  use oxygen to release energy from the sugar glucose .  Aerobic metabolism  occurs when enough oxygen reaches cells to support energy  needs.   Anaerobic metabolism  occurs when the demand for oxygen outstrips the body’s  ability to deliver it. Without enough oxygen, muscle cells  break down glucose   to produce lactic acid .  Lactic acid  is associated with the  “burn”  associated with heavy exercise. If too much  lactic acid  builds up, the  muscles give out .
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Energy flow and chemical cycling in the Biosphere Photosynthesis  and  cellular respiration  provide energy for life All living organisms require  energy  to maintain homeostasis, to  move, and to reproduce Photosynthesis  converts energy  from the sun to  glucose  and    oxygen. Fuel molecules in  food  represent solar energy. Energy stored in  food  can be traced back to the sun. Animals depend on plants to convert  solar  energy to  chemical  energy. This chemical    energy is in the form of  sugars  and other  organic  molecules . Cellular respiration  breaks down glucose  and  releases   energy in  ATP Energy  flows through an ecosystem;  chemicals  are recycled
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Producers and Consumers Photosynthesis Uses  light  energy from the  sun  to power a  chemical process  that makes  organic molecules . Occurs in the leaves of terrestrial plants. Autotrophs/Producers  Are “ self-feeders .” Include  plants  and other  organisms  that make all their own organic matter from  inorganic  nutrients . Biologists refer to  plants  and other  autotrophs  as the  producers  in an ecosystem. Heterotrophs/Consumers  Are “ other-feeders” Include  humans  and  other animals  that cannot make  organic molecules  from  inorganic ones. Heterotrophs  are  consumers,  because they  eat   plants  or  other animals.
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The ingredients for photosynthesis are  carbon dioxide and water .  CO2  is obtained from the  air    by a  plants leaves  H2O  is obtained from the   damp soil   by a  plants roots  Chloroplasts  rearrange the atoms of  these ingredients to  produce sugar   ( glucose ) and other  organic  molecules .  O2 gas
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This note was uploaded on 09/22/2011 for the course BIO 141 taught by Professor Brown during the Fall '08 term at Drexel.

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Wk 2 Lec 2s - Chapter6 Respiration:...

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