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Chapter 3a Differences in Culture

Chapter 3a Differences in Culture - Chapter 3 Differences...

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3-1 Click to edit Master subtitle style Chapter 3 Differences in Culture
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3-2 Introduction Cross-cultural literacy (an understanding of how cultural differences across and within nations can affect the way in which business is practiced) is important to success in international business There may be a relationship between culture and the costs of doing business in a country or region Culture is not static, and the actions of MNEs can contribute to cultural change
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3-3 What is Culture? Question: What is culture? Culture is a system of values (abstract ideas about what a group believes to be good, right, and desirable) and norms (the social rules and guidelines that prescribe appropriate behavior in particular situations) that are shared among a group of people and that when taken together constitute a design for living A society is a group of people who share a common set of values and norms
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3-4 Values and Norms Values provide the context within which a society’s norms are established and justified Norms are the social rules that govern the actions of people toward one another and can be further subdivided into folkways (the routine conventions of everyday life) mores (norms that are seen as central to the functioning of a society and to its social life)
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3-5 Culture, Society, and the Nation-State A society can be defined as a group of people that share a common set of values and norms There is not a strict one-to-one correspondence between a society and a nation-state Nation- states are political creations that can contain a single culture or several cultures Some cultures embrace several nations
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3-6 The Determinants of Culture The values and norms of a culture are the evolutionary product of a number of factors at work in a society including prevailing political and economic philosophies a society’s social structure the dominant religion, language, and education
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3-7 The Determinants of Culture The Determinants of Culture
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3-8 Classroom Performance System Abstract ideas about what a society believes to be good right and desirable are called a) Attitudes b) Norms c) Values d) Mores
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3-9 Social Structure A society's social structure is its basic social organization Two dimensions to consider: the degree to which the basic unit of social organization is the individual, as opposed to the group the degree to which a society is stratified into classes or castes
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3-10 Individuals and Groups A group is an association of two or more individuals who have a shared sense of identity and who interact with each other in structured ways on the basis of a common set of expectations about each other’s behavior Groups are common in many Asian societies Many Western countries emphasize the individual
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3-11 Individuals and Groups In societies where the individual is emphasized individual achievement and entrepreneurship are promoted but, this can encourage job switching,
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