22_hazards2_09_post

22_hazards2_09_post - 22: Natural Hazards 2 Earthquakes...

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zards 2: zards 2: 1 22: Natural Hazards 2 Mexico  City,  1985 Indian  Ocean  tsunami,  2004
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zards 2: zards 2: 2 Earthquakes: largest Armenia, 1999 Northridge, CA, 1994 Kobe, Japan, 1995
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zards 2: zards 2: 3
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zards 2: zards 2: 4 Earthquake damage: offsets Fig. 10.6 3-meter offset of fence near Bolinas, CA, produced by  1906 San Francisco earthquake.  Photo: G.K. Gilbert Fig. 10.1
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zards 2: zards 2: 5 Earthquake damage: shaking Fig. 10.27 Surface waves
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zards 2: zards 2: 6 Photo: California St. Univ. Freeway collapse, 1995 Kobe, Japan,  earthquake.  Photo: Reuters/Corbis EQ damage: shaking
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zards 2: zards 2: 7 (a) Concrete-slab or steel (a) Concrete-slab or steel supports disconnect and supports disconnect and collapse collapse (b) Building’s façade falls off (b) Building’s façade falls off (c) Poorly supported bridge (c) Poorly supported bridge collapses collapses (d) Bridge span disconnects and (d) Bridge span disconnects and collapses collapses Fig. 10.28 Earthquake damage: shaking
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zards 2: zards 2: 8 Earthquake damage: shaking Fig. 10.28 (e) Neighboring buildings (e) Neighboring buildings collide and shatter; collide and shatter; floors inside a tall floors inside a tall building may collapse building may collapse (f) Concrete-block, brick (f) Concrete-block, brick or adobe buildings or adobe buildings crack apart and crack apart and collapse collapse (g) Steep cliff collapses, (g) Steep cliff collapses, carrying buildings with carrying buildings with it it
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zards 2: zards 2: 9 Caused by ruptured gas lines (ruptured water lines add to problem) Fig. 10.33 Photo: AP Earthquake damage: fires
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zards 2: zards 2: 10 10 San Francisco, 1906: most deaths caused by fire Fig. 10.25 Earthquake damage: fire
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zards 2: zards 2: 11 11 Fig. 10.34 Earthquake damage: Tsunamis
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zards 2: zards 2: 12 12   Liquefaction : shaking turns water-saturated sediment into  quicksand; cannot support any structures built on it Fig. 10.32 Earthquake damage
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zards 2: zards 2: 13 13   Liquefaction : shaking turns water-saturated sediment into  quicksand; cannot support any structures built on it See Fig. 10.32 Earthquake damage Liquefied  sediment  expelled from  fissure  following  earthquake. Photo: P.L.  Kresan
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zards 2: zards 2: 14 14 Fig. 10.31 Earthquake damage: landslides Liquefaction increases risk of landslides.
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zards 2: zards 2: 15 15 1964 Alaska Earthquake.   Photo: NGDC Earthquake damage: landslides
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zards 2: zards 2: 16 16 Review Questions 22-1. The magnitude of the largest earthquake recorded this century is ___. A. 9.5 B. 9.2 C. 9.1 D. 9.0 22-2.  A. True / B. False:  The earthquake with the highest death toll also had the highest  magnitude.   22-3.  A. True / B. False:  Only surface waves cause earthquake damage. 22-4. 
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22_hazards2_09_post - 22: Natural Hazards 2 Earthquakes...

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