SP11_20Ch4_20review_1_

SP11_20Ch4_20review_1_ - Ch. 4 Humidity, Condensation, &...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ch. 4 Humidity, Condensation, & Clouds Remember, humidity is not constant through time or space, there is constant Circulation of water through the hydrologic cycle - The total amount of water vapor stored in the atmosphere amounts to only one week’s supply of precipitation for the planet. Evaporative coolers are primarily used in climates where the summers are hot and dry. The three states (or phases) of matter: gas, liquid, and solid. Phase is related to molecular motion; an increase or decrease in motion creates a phase change. Ice is the coolest/slowest phase. Water vapor is the warmest/fastest phase. Evaporation is the change of liquid into a gas and requires heat. Condensation is the change of a gas into a liquid and releases heat. Saturation is an equilibrium condition in which for each molecule that evaporates, one condenses. Condensation Phase Change from Vapor to Liquid Release of Latent Heat of Vaporization When the air is saturated, the air temperature equals the wet-bulb temperature the relative humidity is 100% the air temperature equals the dew point temperature the wet bulb temperature equals the dew point temperature Humidity Specific Humidity: mass of water vapor/mass of air Mixing ratio: mass of water vapor/mass of dry air Neither measurement changes with volume, must add or subtract water vapor. Vapor Pressure (e) the partial pressure due to water molecules mixed with air Saturation Vapor Pressure (e S ) the maximum possible value of vapor pressure (depends on temperature) The temperature to which air must be cooled in order to become saturated is the dew point temperature (T d ). As the difference between the air temperature and the dew point
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 09/25/2011 for the course 670 201 taught by Professor Hopey during the Spring '11 term at Rutgers.

Page1 / 4

SP11_20Ch4_20review_1_ - Ch. 4 Humidity, Condensation, &...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online