ECE4500_Project1

ECE4500_Project1 - Virginia Tech ECE 4500 Spring 2009...

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Virginia Tech ECE 4500 Spring 2009 Project 1 Due at 11:59 p.m. (EST) on March 1 Name: ___________________________________ ID Number: ______________________ Introduction The objective of this project is to reinforce your understanding of combinational logic design and logic simulation. You must design a circuit according to the specifications given below, and then test your design by simulating it using the Logisim simulator. (As described in Homework 3, this tool can be downloaded at no cost from http://ozark.hendrix.edu/~burch/logisim/ .) Finally, document your work by writing a short report. Specification Design and simulate a combinational logic circuit that controls a seven-segment display. Use the display device that is available in Logisim’s Input/Output library. It accepts 8 logic signals as input, and it drives individual display segments ON or OFF based on these signals. With the appropriate input levels, recognizable (decimal) numbers will appear on the display, as illustrated in Figure 1. Figure 1. Example of a 7-segment display showing the numeral “4”. Although this device is called a “7-segment display,” it actually contains 8 segments if we count the small dot (period) at the lower right. More information about this device is provided in Logisim’s documentation: With Logisim running, click Help Æ Library Reference Æ Input/Output Library Æ 7-segment display. The input to your circuit will be 4 binary signals named I3 , I2 , I1 , and I0 . These signals will represent the binary encoding of a number in the range 0 to 9 (decimal), with I0 representing the least significant bit. These signals should cause the display to appear as indicated in Table 1. Note that 16 unique combinations are possible for these 4 inputs, but only 10 different numbers should be displayed. For the last 6 input combinations, as shown in the table, your circuit should cause the dot on the device to illuminate instead of showing a numerical value.
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This note was uploaded on 09/24/2011 for the course ECE ECE4500 taught by Professor Kam during the Spring '10 term at Virginia Tech.

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ECE4500_Project1 - Virginia Tech ECE 4500 Spring 2009...

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