Managing stress in project.pptx - Managing stress in...

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Unformatted text preview: Managing stress in project Group members 1. 2. Introduction Managing stress in project: Before we deal management of stress in the project, we need to address what is the characteristics of project and what can be encountered while managing project. A project is a finite process with a definite start and end with deliverables in each step. Projects always need to be managed in order to be successful. For genuine commitment to the project, all parties must be clear about why the project is needed, what it is intended to achieve, how the outcome is to be achieved and what their responsibilities are in that achievement. Stress is defined as normal physical response to events that make someone feel threatened or upset his/her balance in some way. When danger is sensed whether it is real or imagined. The body's defenses kick into high gear in a rapid, automatic process known as the “fight-or-flight-or-freeze” reaction, or the stress response How can we relate stress with project? Project is simply an intention to do something. This will be taken for granted. Whether a project makes sense, whether it is timely, good or even required or not. Can other people do that? Is it sensitive or difficult, can the projects may face multiple expected and unexpected phenomena from the external and internal environment. The answers for all query need in-depth thought. The project management exert multiple effort that is required to plan, implement and monitor successful project. In project work, some of the external triggers for stress could be a large number of stakeholders, an unreasonable client, and a high degree of technical complexity, a challenging team or lack of clear expectations. There are a myriad of reasons why our adrenalin levels can spiral out of control and cause us to work long hours not just for a few weeks but also for months at the time. Whereas short bursts of stress can have a positive effect on performance, prolonged stress is harmful to the body and can cause exhaustion. Nature of project A project has delineated goal that should be achieved over a finite given time with allocated resources. The resources allocated needs strong project leader and project staff that need wellcoordinated management skill which encompass;- technical human and conceptual skills. A manager forecast each level of the project cycle with internal external and team role that may contribute for success and that may hinder the achievement of goal. The project management encompass many steps in its cycle and all the steps need vigorous mental, social, physical and psychological exercises as to attain goal desired 1. Define the Problem 2. Establish a Project Charter 3. Define the scope 4. Identify Customers and Other Stakeholders, 5. understand the Current State 6. Identify Customer Requirement and 7. Prioritize the Requirements 8. Identify Potential Solutions 9. Evaluate Potential Solutions’ Effect on Customer Requirements 10. Define the New State Project related stress Project management suffer from stress in development phase due to Insufficient attention in checking that a valid business case exists for the project, Insufficient attention to quality at the outset and during development, Insufficient definition of the required outcomes, leading to confusion over what the project is expected to achieve. Lack sufficient skill of communication with stakeholders and interested parties, leading to products being delivered that are not what the customer wanted. Inadequate definition and lack of acceptance of project management roles and responsibilities, leading to lack of direction and poor decision-making, Poor estimation of duration and costs, leading to projects taking more time and costing more money than expected. These can be results of inadequate planning and co-ordination of resources, leading to poor scheduling Monitoring can be a source of stress due to Insufficient measurable and lack of control over progress, so that projects do not reveal their exact status until too late and Lack of quality control, resulting in the delivery of products that are unacceptable or unusable. These all situation need meticulous approach in project design. Effect of stress Project management is full of hassles, deadlines, frustrations, and demands. For many people, stress is so commonplace that it has become a way of life. Stress is not always bad. In small doses, it can help you perform under pressure and motivate to do best. However, when constantly running in emergency mode, the mind and body pay the price. One can protect by recognizing the signs and symptoms of stress and taking steps to reduce its harmful effects. The stress response is the body’s way of protecting you. When working properly, it helps you stay focused, energetic, and alert. In emergencies, stress can save your life giving you extra strength to defend yourself, for example, or spurring you to slam on the brakes to avoid an accident. The stress response also helps you rise to meet challenges. Stress is what keeps you on your toes during a presentation at work, sharpens your concentration when you are attempting the game-winning free throw, or drives you to study for an exam when you would rather be watching TV. But beyond a certain point, stress stops being helpful and starts causing major damage to your health, your mood, your productivity, your relationships, and your quality of life. It is important to learn how to recognize when your stress levels are out of control. The most dangerous thing about stress is how easily it can creep up on you. You get used to it. It starts to feel familiar, even normal. You do not notice how much it's affecting you, even as it takes a heavy toll. Stress Marker Foot on the gas – An angry, agitated, or “fight,” stress response. You are heated, keyed up, overly emotional, and unable to sit still. Foot on the brake – A withdrawn, depressed, or “flight,” stress response. You shut down, pull away, space out, and show very little energy or emotion. Foot on both – A tense or “freeze” stress response. You become frozen under pressure and cannot do anything. You look paralyzed, but under the surface, you are extremely agitated. Signs and symptoms Cognitive Symptoms Memory problems Inability to concentrate Poor judgment Seeing only the negative Anxious or racing thoughts Constant worrying Emotional Symptoms Moodiness Irritability or short temper Agitation, inability to relax Feeling overwhelmed Sense of loneliness and isolation Depression or general unhappiness Physical Symptoms Behavioral Symptoms Aches and pains Diarrhea or constipation Nausea, dizziness Chest pain, rapid heartbeat Loss of sex drive Frequent colds Eating more or less Sleeping too much or too little Isolating yourself from others Procrastinating or neglecting responsibilities Using alcohol, cigarettes, or drugs to relax Nervous habits (e.g. nail biting, pacing) How much stress is too much? Because of the widespread damage stress can cause, it's important to know your own limit. But just how much stress is "too much" differs from person to person. We are all different. Some people are able to roll with the punches, while others seem to crumble in the face of far smaller obstacles or frustrations. Some people even seem to thrive on the excitement and challenge of a high-stress lifestyle. Your ability to tolerate stress depends on many factors, including the quality of your relationships, your general outlook on life, your emotional intelligence, and genetics. Things that influence stress tolerance level Support network Sense of control Attitude and outlook Ability to deal with emotions Knowledge and preparation Cause of stress External Internal Major life changes Unrealistic expectations/Perfectionism Work or school Rigid thinking, lack of flexibility Financial problems All-or-nothing attitude Being too busy Chronic worry Children and family Pessimism Relationship difficulties Negative self-talk Health problems related to stress Pain of any kind Heart disease Digestive problems Sleep problems • Depression Weight problems Autoimmune diseases Skin conditions, such as eczema Dealing with stress and its symptoms While unchecked stress is undeniably damaging, you have more control over your stress levels than you might think. Unfortunately, many people cope with stress in ways that only compound the problem. You might drink too much to unwind at the end of a stressful day, fill up on comfort food, zone out in front of the TV or computer for hours, use pills to relax, or relieve stress by lashing out at other people. However, there are many healthier ways to cope with stress and its symptoms. Since everyone has a unique response to stress, there is no “one size fits all” solution to dealing with it. No single method works for everyone or in every situation, so experiment with different techniques and strategies. Focus on what makes you feel calm and in control. Action Avoid unnecessary stress. Not all stress can be avoided, but by learning how to say no, distinguishing between “shoulds” and “musts” on your to-do list, and steering clear of people or situations that stress you out, you can eliminate many daily stressors. Alter the situation. If you can’t avoid a stressful situation, try to alter it. Be more assertive and deal with problems head on. Instead of bottling up your feelings and increasing your stress, respectfully let others know about your concerns. Or be more willing to compromise and try meeting others halfway on an issue. Adapt to the stressor. When you can’t change the stressor, try changing yourself. Reframe problems or focus on the positive things in your life. If a task at work has you stressed, focus on the aspects of your job you do enjoy. And always look at the big picture: is this really something worth getting upset about? Accept the things you can’t change. There will always be stressors in life that you can’t do anything about. Learn to accept the inevitable rather than rail against a situation and making it even more stressful. Look for the upside in a situation—even the most stressful circumstances can be an opportunity for learning or personal growth. Learn to accept that no one, including you, is ever perfect. Stress reduction for successful project management Plan better Learn to say no Laugh together Get more rest Take short, frequent breaks Take an exercise class or go for a walk Become more positive Adopt pet therapy Set up a music, art, or games room ...
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