Lecture 1

Lecture 1 - True or False? The official language of the...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–17. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
True or False? • The official language of the United States of America is English. False
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
True or False? • The language of prestige in England (at least in recorded history) has always been English. False
Background image of page 2
True or False? • Former President George W. Bush is a fluent speaker of English. True
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
True or False? • “It don’t matter.” is a grammatically correct sentence in English. it depends on the dialect
Background image of page 4
True or False? • “He be runnin right now.” is a grammatical sentence in African American English. False
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
True or False? • Native Americans all spoke (speak) the same language variety. False
Background image of page 6
True or False? • English, French and Italian are languages, but Navajo, Apache and Kumeyaay (spoken in the San Diego county) are dialects. False
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
True or False? • English has the largest vocabulary of any language in the world. ???Perhaps, due to its heavy borrowing from many languages, but what’s the point of this question?
Background image of page 8
This time guess: • How many language varieties are unique to the United States? 162 languages with at least 1 fluent speaker Nearly 50 (American Indian languages) indigenous to California alone!
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Language and Culture Knowing a language is not just knowing words and rules of grammar Language is used as a placeholder for a person’s character, ethnicity, or its membership in a social group “The destruction of language is the destruction of cultural and ethnic identity” (Joshua Fishman)
Background image of page 10
Languages and Cultures of America L IGN 8, S PRING 2010
Background image of page 11

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
The linguistic history and linguistic diversity of the US alone is worth several courses of material Indigenous Languages Spanish, French, English, German, among others Colonial Recent Other European, Asian, African Languages; among others The First Peoples
Background image of page 12
Goals To understand and appreciate the intrinsic value of diversity of language varieties spoken in the US and beyond. To use linguistics as a tool to engage in informed, critical discussions about language, culture and society. To address stereotypes about language, and learn how values about language shape language attitudes, language practices and our own language identities. To discuss how sociopolitical issues often masquerade as language/linguistic issues.
Background image of page 13

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Language use in the United States Major Issues of Language Policy • Issues of “endangered languages” • Language “maintenance” & Language revitalization/reclamation • The Ebonics controversy • Official English / English Only
Background image of page 14
Language use in the United States Factors that affect language use: • Geography (where people live) • Age • Gender/Sexuality • Social Class and Life Experience • Ethnicity/Immigration History • Political/Social Ideology
Background image of page 15

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon