Lecture 15 New Languages - ASL

Lecture 15 New Languages - ASL - Recent Immigrant Languages...

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Recent Immigrant Languages from Asia Some immigrant languages from Asia (and # of speakers in the US, according to the ethnologue): * Korean (894,000) * Telugu (86,200) * Chinese (1,645,000 2,022,143 ) * Gujarati (236,000) * Mandarin Chinese (175,000) * Central Khmer (182,000) * Japanese (478,000) * Hmong Daw (168,000) * Vietnamese (1,900,000 1,009,627 ) * Hmong Njua (100,000) * Tagalog (1,220,000) * Thai (120,000) * Hindi (317,000) * Urdu (263,000) Note that the original numbers for Vietnamese and Chinese were in fact given as such in ethnologue; corrected numbers come from a 2000 census brief: www. census .gov/prod/2003pubs/c2kbr-29.pdf
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New Language Varieties: American Sign Language (ASL)
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ASL: some basics ASL is an autonomous linguistic system like any other language, where the medium of expression is visual instead of aural. Sign language is NOT universal. Some signs are iconic, but most are arbitrary. The language used by the American Deaf community (used in Canada as well). Estimated number of users (both deaf and hearing): somewhere between half a million to two million (Schein 1989, cited in Lucas & Valli, p. 231).
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The History of ASL The first American deaf school was established in 1817: American School for the Deaf (in Hartford, Connecticut), founded by Thomas H. Gallaudet. The sign language students and staff used consisted of a blend of idiolects used in U.S. prior to 1817, Martha’s Vineyard Sign Language, and French Sign Language. This combination of idiolects/languages gave rise to a pidgin which eventually became a creole .
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What are Pidgins? Varieties that arises when two or more languages come
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This note was uploaded on 09/24/2011 for the course LIGN 8 taught by Professor Bakovic,e during the Spring '08 term at UCSD.

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Lecture 15 New Languages - ASL - Recent Immigrant Languages...

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