Lecture 14 Heritage Languages

Lecture 14 Heritage Languages - Reminder Report Outline The...

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Reminder: Report Outline The outline is due next Monday, May 10, by 12pm. The outline should minimally contain identification of the results and correlations of: * noteworthy results from your own interviewee data * Identification and discussion of at least two correlations in the overall class data. At most 150- 200 words of preliminary discussion on those results and correlations. A WebCT assessment with one paragraph-style question is already available for submitting your outline.
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More Recent Immigrant Languages
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More Recent Immigrant Languages Immigrant languages from Europe: • Swedish, Norwegian (mid-1800s) - Minnesota • Italian (late 1800s) - New York • Yiddish (late 1800s) - New York- (Maintenance of Yiddish in the Hasidic communities in the Northeast) • Greek
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“What is this language?” Top five languages besides English In 1990: 1. Spanish 2. French 3. German 4. Italian 5. Chinese In 2000: 1. Spanish 2. Chinese 3. French 4. German 5. Tagalog Trends: major European languages are moving down; Asian languages are moving up.
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Recent Immigrant Languages from Asia Some immigrant languages from Asia (and # of speakers in the US, according to the ethnologue): * Korean (894,000) * Telugu (86,200) * Chinese (1,645,000 2,022,143 ) * Gujarati (236,000) * Mandarin Chinese (175,000) * Central Khmer (182,000) * Japanese (478,000) * Hmong Daw (168,000) * Vietnamese (1,900,000 1,009,627 ) * Hmong Njua (100,000) * Tagalog (1,220,000) * Thai (120,000) * Hindi (317,000) * Urdu (263,000) Note that the original numbers for Vietnamese and Chinese were in fact given as such in ethnologue; corrected numbers come from a 2000 census brief: www. census .gov/prod/2003pubs/c2kbr-29.pdf
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Recent changing patterns of immigration • A major immigration act in 1965 facilitated the recent changing patterns of immigration: • It barred discrimination based on national origin, allowed for up to 20,000 immigrants per country per year, and specified three criteria to evaluate whether a given person could immigrate: 1) Possession of occupational skills needed in U.S. labor market 2) Family relation to those already in the U.S. 3) Vulnerability to political and religious persecution
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Current Populations (2000 Census) Chinese - 2.7 million (Mandarin, Cantonese, Taiwanese) Filipinos - 2.4 million Indians - 1.9 million Vietnamese - 1.2 million Korean - 1.2 million Japanese 1.1 million Cambodian (178,043), Pakistanis (155,909), Hmong (170,049), Laotians (167,792), Thais (110,851).
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Immigrant Languages Asian Immigration: Specific groups immigrate & emigrate for specific reasons: * Korean 1904: to Sugar Plantations in Hawaii, due to Japanese Colonization of Korea * Chinese 1850s: due to Opium Wars * Chinese 1950: due to rise of Mao * Japanese 1868: due to Meiji Restoration * Vietnamese 1960-70: due to Vietnam War * Filipino: 20th century (& before) due to colonialism * Pacific islander (Hawaiian, Samoan, Tongan, Guamanian)
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Lecture 14 Heritage Languages - Reminder Report Outline The...

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