Lecture 13 Spanglish and Mock Spanish

Lecture 13 Spanglish and Mock Spanish - Some announcements...

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Some announcements The answer key for Assignment #3 will be available later today. In class mid-term exam on Monday (bring your own Scantron and #2 pencil). The “Project Report” folder now contains a folder called “Interviewee data” with the class results from the interviews. !!
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(e)Speedy Gonzales (González?) http:// www.youtube.com/watch?v =37Q5cDj1zL4
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Some phonological features of Chicano English Initial e-/ i: I espen t one day, not very muSH; I don’t know how people can estand it Final consonant drop: Like in the mornin’ I eat one sof’ boil’ egg with a toas’ Consonant clusters get simplified: little > li’l Insertion of vowels to break consonant cluster: people > peepul Greater use of pitch range.
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Problems in the classroom? When they hear Chicano English, many teachers (and others) assume this is the speech of English learners. From this they assume that US born Chicanos speak and incomplete, or “defective” English (and note that not all US born Chicanos speak Chicano English ). Then they (teachers and others) assume that any scholarly problems these students have will get better once they stop speaking Spanish, since it’s interfering with their English, and they need to speak English well. “How a language that children cannot speak can interfere with a language that they do speak is left unexplained” Otto Santa & Robert Bailey. 2008. Chicano English: Phonology. P. 418
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Spanish speakers in the US are not a monolithic group: the Latino community and the Spanish varieties they use are very diverse. Despite large numbers, Spanish in the US is subject to the Three Generation Rule: most working-class Latinos are undergoing language loss. Language loss in this case (as in many others) does not translate into academic or economic success. Vestiges of Spanish in their English make a lot of Latinos
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Lecture 13 Spanglish and Mock Spanish - Some announcements...

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