Lecture 23 Language Identity and Rights

Lecture 23 Language Identity and Rights - Final report due...

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Unformatted text preview: * Final report due this coming Friday, at noon . * The final report must be submitted via the Turnitin.com link available in the Research Report folder on WebCT. * The last day to participate in an experiment is today , WEDNESDAY. * The last day to assign credits to the appropriate class is FRIDAY, June 4 th . Some Reminders Language identity and linguistic human rights Language identity: Constructed languages Constructed Languages • Why do people invent forms of communication? • to ease human communication; • to bring fiction or an associated constructed world to life; • linguistic experimentation; • Play (to have a secret language) Constructed Languages • Secret languages: * Play languages • Fictional (Constructed) languages * Klingon (from the TV show Star Trek) * J.R.R. Tolkien’s languages * Na’vi • “Universal” languages * Esperanto Play Languages • Many languages have associated play languages. • Sometimes invented by children, for fun and or for secrecy. • Pig Latin: Oo-day oo-yay eak-spay Ig-pay Atin-lay? (Do you speak Pig Latin?) • Verlen (l’envers): rima ‘husband’ (< mari), painsco ‘friends’ (< copains), le quem ‘the guy’ (< le mec) • Play languages usually involve a relatively small set of rules that change the sound of words just enough to make it unintelligible to people who don’t know the rules, even if they are native speakers of the source language. Esperanto • Esperanto was developed in the late 19 th century (by Ludovic Zamenhof); goal = to promote world peace with a language that could be used as a bridge of communication and understanding between people of different linguistic, cultural and national backgrounds. • The name of this language is based on the root espeer meaning ‘hope’. Esperanto means ‘one who hopes’. • Source languages for many words in Esperanto: Romance languages, English, German, Russian, Polish, and Greek (for scientific terms). Esperanto * The 1965 horror film Incubus [ Inkubo ] is among the only films that are entirely in Esperanto....
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Lecture 23 Language Identity and Rights - Final report due...

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