Lecture 22 Billingual Education

Lecture 22 Billingual Education - Some updates about...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–8. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Some updates about “ungrammatical” accents in Arizona schools Linguists at the University of Arizona respond (May 26, 2010) to the Arizona Department of Education proposal of removing teachers who have heavy or “ungrammatical” accents:
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 2
Language policy: bilingual education in the US
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Bilingual education An educational system where there are two or more languages of instruction within some delineated time frame “delineated time frame” – e.g., two languages used “within a given school day”, “within elementary school” teaching a second language as a subject (i.e., foreign language instruction) is not “bilingual education” “Additive Bilingualism” Programs: the goal is to achieve bilingualism/biliteracy “Subtractive Bilingualism”: the most common model in the U.S., a transitional Model
Background image of page 4
Bilingual education before the 60’s By the 1930’s there was virtually no bilingual education in the US. Sporadic ethnic day-school programs sponsored by religious organizations. The “Cultural Deprivation Theory” (an educational theory) in the 50’s: * Said immigrant kids were doing poorly in school because of their home environment ESL (English as a Second Language) programs used with minority language speaking children (Kids would be taken out of regular classes 2-5 times a week for 45 minute compensatory English instruction)
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Civil Rights Movement (1960’s) Civil Rights Act: “No person can be excluded from participation in, or be denied the benefits of a federally supported program or activity on the basis of race, color, or national origin.” “Sink or Swim” immersion education had become very controversial. “Equal” treatment can mean unequal opportunity 1961 Dade County Public Schools in Florida: Cuban Spanish speakers and English speaking classmates; kids in these schools outperformed kids in monolingual English schools in reading tests
Background image of page 6
1968 Bilingual Education Act 1968 Bilingual Education Act: make funds available for states and local districts to develop bilingual programs. Assumption: the use of the home language at school would help students access the school’s curriculum, while learning English to facilitate their transition into the English monolingual system. Based on the theory of transfer of knowledge (once you
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 8
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 22

Lecture 22 Billingual Education - Some updates about...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 8. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online