Lecture 16 History of English

Lecture 16 History of English - House keeping stuff Extra...

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House keeping stuff • Extra credit course feedback survey is available today (2pm) and until Friday at noon . • Assignment #4 will be available this Wednesday, May 12 (2pm) and will be due next Monday, May 17 at noon .
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The history of English
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The Germanic Language Family English is a Germanic language from the West- Germanic Branch
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First documented language in Britain: a Celtic language (400 B.C.E)
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Meanwhile, the Roman Empire was expanding
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Romans in Britain • 55 B.C.E. Julius Caesar Britain, brought back news of the people and their language • 114-220 C.E. Rome sent garrisons to Britain • Romans lived in military camps • Roman subjects still remaining in Britain until 476 C.E.
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Germanic groups crossed the North Sea from Denmark and Saxony Germany starting around CE 449. http://www.windowsonwarwickshire.org.uk/spotlights/anglo_saxons/eur_map.htm
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Anglo-Saxons in Britain Romans leaving Britain left power void, quickly filled by Anglo-Saxons They were Germanic speaking groups that came from continental Europe From 5 th -8 th centuries, waves of Angles & Saxons came to England, pushing Celtic speaking peoples to the periphery Removal of Celts resulted in Germanic speaking England
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English Language Periods Old English (~1100 CE) * Anglo-Saxons arrive in Britain in 5 th century * Norse Invasion 800-900 CE * Literature: Beowulf Middle English (1100-1500 CE) * Norman invasion 1066 * Literature: Chaucer’s The Canterbury Tales Modern English (1500> CE) * Renaissance * Literature: Shakespeare’s plays and sonnets
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the Lord’s Prayer in Old English Fader ure þ u þ e eArt on heofonum; Si þ in nAmA gehAlgod to becume þ in rice gewur þ e ð in willA on eor ð An swA swA on heofonum. urne gedaghwAmlicAn hlAf syle us todag And forgyf us ure gyltAs swA swA we forgyfA ð urum gyltendum And ne gelad þ u us on costnunge Ac Alys us of yfele so þ lice FAther our thou thAt Art in heAvens; be thy nAme hAllowed come thy kingdom be-done thy will on eArth As in heAvens. our dAily breAd give us todAy And forgive us our sins As we forgive those-who-hAve- sinned-AgAinst-us And not leAd thou us into temptAtion but deliver us from evil. truly.
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Loanwords from Celtic languages Old English Period brocc ‘badger’ cumb ‘combe, valley’ place names: London, Carlisle, Devon, Dover, Cornwall, Thames, Avon, etc. A few place names (Winchester, Lancaster, Worchester) start with a Celtic morpheme but end w/ the Roman ‘caster’ or ‘chester’ meaning ‘camp’ < Latin castra
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