laws of motion

laws of motion - Laws of motion mechanics Scientific Method...

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Laws of motion mechanics
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Scientific Method Observation, hypothesis, experiment, law, theory Architects of mechanics and motions Aristotle, Galileo, and Newton Aristotle’s Theory of Natural and Violent Motion Motion proceeds from the nature (earth, water, fire, air) of the object Force is required to create or maintain non-natural motion Galileo’s experiments Leaning tower of pisa – falling body hypothesis Inclined plane experiments Inertia
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Architects of Motion Aristotle (384-322 BC) Sir Isaac Newton (1642-1727) Galileo Galilei (1564-1642) Theory of Natural and Violent Motions Author of Principia Mathematica Philosophie Naturalis inertia
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Newton’s First Law An object that is not subject to any external influences moves at a constant VELOCITY, covering equal DISTANCES in equal TIMES, along a straight-line path Newton's second Law Acceleration of an object is directly proportional to force, is in the direction of the force and inversely related to the mass of the object Newton's third Law Whenever one object exerts a force on a second object, the second object exerts an equal and opposite force on the first.
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U.S. Open Professional World Championship, 1997 coasting ! hanging-in ! Object in motion tends to remain in motion Object at rest tends to remain at rest + Inertia
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Practical scenarios that mimic conditions For the Newton's First Law Mechanical Equilibrium When sum of all forces acting on the object or the net force is zero, the object is said to be in mechanical equilibrium Objects in mechanical equilibrium obey Newton's first law
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Equilibrium of Stationary Objects Consider a book lying on the table, is it in equilibrium ?
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laws of motion - Laws of motion mechanics Scientific Method...

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