Review - TransmissionLines Lattice(bounce)diagram

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Lattice (bounce) diagram This is a space/time diagram which is used to keep track of multiple reflections. Transmission Lines Transmission Lines Voltage at the  receiving end U l T = Ideal voltage  source z 30 90 30 90 + - = z 30 10 30 10 + - =
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Points to Remember 1. In this chapter we have surveyed several different types of waves on  transmission lines. It is important that these different cases not be confused.  When approaching a transmission-line problem, the student should begin by  asking,  “Are the waves in this problem sinusoidal, or rectangular pulses? Is  the line ideal, or does it have losses?”  Then the proper approach to the  problem can be taken.  2. The ideal lossless line supports waves of any shape (sinusoidal or non- sinusoidal), and transmits them without distortion. The velocity of these  waves is         . The ratio of the voltage to current is              , provided that  only one wave is present. Sinusoidal waves are treated using phasor  analysis. (A common error is that of attempting to analyze  non -sinusoidal  waves with phasors. Beware! This makes no sense at all.) 3. When the line contains series resistance and or shunt conductance it is said  to be  lossy . Lossy lines no longer exhibit undistorted propagation; hence a  rectangular pulse launched on such a line will not remain rectangular, instead  evolving into irregular, messy shapes. However, sinusoidal waves, because  of their unique mathematical properties, do continue to be sinusoidal on lossy  lines. The presence of losses changes the velocity of propagation and  causes the wave to be attenuated (become smaller) as it travels.  LC k ϖ = LC U P / 1 = C L Z o / = β / = P U d d U G / = 2 / 1 ) ( - LC C L Z o / = Transmission Lines Transmission Lines
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3 Electrostatics Electrostatics Consider a charged wire. Charge on an elemental wire segment     is     so that the charge  per unit length               . The total electric field is the sum of the field contributions from the 
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Review - TransmissionLines Lattice(bounce)diagram

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