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lecture21 - COMP 250 Winter 2010 21 - binary search trees 2...

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Unformatted text preview: COMP 250 Winter 2010 21 - binary search trees 2 March 5, 2010 Removing a node from a binary search tree The last operation we consider on binary search trees is to remove a node. Here is a recursive algorithm for doing it. remove(root, key){ if( root == null ) return null else if ( key < root.key ) (**) root.left = remove( root.left, key ) else if ( key > root.key ) (**) root.right = remove( root.right, key) else if root.left == null (*) return root.right else if root.right == null return root.left else{ root.key = findMin( root.right ).key; root.right = remove( root.right, root.key ); } return root; } Note the argument root is only the root of the BST in the first call of the method. In subsequent (recursive) calls, root is the root of a subtree. There are a few subtleties in the algorithm that need explaining. Lets consider different cases: The node to be removed is a leaf. In this case, we could find the parent of the node (assuming there is a parent) and replace the parents child reference to the node with a null reference. This is easy to do if we have a parent reference at each node (similar to removing the tail element of a doubly linked list)....
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This note was uploaded on 09/25/2011 for the course COMP 250 taught by Professor Blanchette during the Spring '08 term at McGill.

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lecture21 - COMP 250 Winter 2010 21 - binary search trees 2...

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