CJS 210 Week 5 Checkpoint Influence of Case Law on Policing

CJS 210 Week 5 Checkpoint Influence of Case Law on Policing...

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Influence of Case Law on Policing 1 Influence of Case Law on Policing Brandon Ashley CJS/210 – Fundamentals of Policing August 30, 2010 Case Law 1
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Influence of Case Law on Policing 2 Weeks v. United States (1914) I feel this case was of great importance and had a positive effect in today’s policing world. The police in this case entered a person’s home that was under arrest and obtained evidence that led to the person’s conviction and imprisonment, without a warrant. The case was later appealed and the person’s conviction was overturned. After this incident, the Supreme Court created the exclusionary rule. “The exclusionary rule provided that any evidence seized in violation of the Fourth Amendment could not be used against a defendant in a criminal case. The exclusionary rule, as enunciated in the Weeks case, applied only to evidence seized in an unconstitutional search and seizure by a federal agent and used in a federal court. It did not apply to state courts.” (Policing, 2005)
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This note was uploaded on 09/25/2011 for the course CRIM JUSTI CJS taught by Professor Sanchez during the Spring '11 term at University of Phoenix.

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CJS 210 Week 5 Checkpoint Influence of Case Law on Policing...

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