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Chapter_18_Study_Guide

Chapter_18_Study_Guide - Chapter 18 GOTHIC EUROPE 1 Lecture...

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Chapter 18 GOTHIC EUROPE 1. Lecture Strategies and Key Ideas. This chapter introduces the student to the Gothic period dominated by the construction of the great French Cathedrals. Each country added its own aesthetic vision to this French style, first found in the remodeled Saint-Denis Church in Paris. It was built under the direction of Abbot Suger in 1140. The churches were the result of great vision, but also of economic will. Cities competed with one another to have the biggest and tallest Gothic structure, a competition that sometimes had disastrous consequences. It might help students to divide the chapter into “Early Gothic,” “High Gothic” and “Late Gothic” lessons. Early Gothic is found in the new ambulatory design at Saint Denis (FIG. 18-2) and in the overall interior and exterior of Chartres and Notre Dame de Paris. High Gothic begins with Chartres’ “Porch of the Confessors” (FIG. 18-17), and sculptures recalling the transition from Archaic to Classical style in chapter 5. Students might remember Gothic as a “request for height and light.” The photograph of Reims Cathedral (FIG. 18-23) illustrates the Gothic aesthetic for students. The great windows of colored glass were made possible with the use of flying buttresses to support the tall walls. (see the discussion Stained-Glass Windows on page 472). The architectural vocabulary learned in the Romanesque chapter is found in the three-dimensional schematic found on page 469 with distinctive Gothic additions. Gothic architecture kept its “sacred geometry,” but in order to build taller structures and higher ceilings architects used the pointed arch, ribbed vault and the flying buttress (see The Gothic Rib Vault  page 464). Students should be aware of the design and history of Saint Denis and of Chartres Cathedral and its sculpture (the so-called pillar people of the jambs), its stained glass windows, and especially its famed Rose Window (FIG. 18-1). An interesting graphic is the illustration of nave elevations , (FIG. 18-10) showing how the early Gothic interior design evolved from
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