Chapter_12_13_Printable

Chapter_12_13_Printable - Chapter 12 A d d re s s in g I...

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1 Chapter 12 Addressing Illnesses: Industrial Hygiene Industrial Hygiene • Defined: That science or art devoted to the anticipation, recognition, evaluation, and control of those environmental factors or stresses, arising in or from the workplace, which may cause sickness, impaired health and well- being or significant discomfort and inefficiency among workers or among the citizens of the community. Industrial Hygienist • Trained in engineering, physics, chemistry, or biology, has acquired by undergraduate and/or postgraduate study and experience, a knowledge of the effects upon health of chemical and physical agents under various levels of exposure.
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2 • The Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSHAct) has brought a restructuring of programs and activities relating to safeguarding the health of the worker. • Every employer needs to implement some element of an industrial hygiene or occupational health or hazard communication program, to be responsive to OSHA and the OSHAct and its health regulations. Industrial Hygienist • 1. Identify potential risk factors. • 2. Evaluate the chemicals that you are using and make recommendations on controls. • 3. Select and conduct sampling methods for chemical and other environmental factors. • 4. Recommend appropriate PPE. • 5. Ventilation in the workplace. • 6. Ergonomic issues. • 7. Biological Agents • 8. Address Radiation, temperature extremes, noise. Environmental Factors or Stressess • They are physical, biological, ergonomic and chemical.
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3 Physical Hazards • Nonionizing and ionizing radiation, noise, vibration, and extremes of temperature and pressure. Any of these have or can have serious adverse effects upon your workplace. Biological Hazards • Biological hazards include vermin, insects, molds, fungi, viruses, and bacterial contaminants. • Sanitation and housekeeping items regarding potable water, removal of industrial waste and sewage, food handling, and personal cleanliness have the potential to exacerbate the potential risk of biological hazards. Ergonomic Hazards • Ergonomic Hazards include improperly designed tools or work areas. Improper lifting or reaching, poor visual conditions, or repeated motions in an awkward position can result in accidents or illnesses in the occupational environment. Designing the tools and the job to be done to fit the worker should be of prime importance.
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4 Chemical Hazards • Chemical Hazards arise from excessive
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This note was uploaded on 09/25/2011 for the course HSMB 303 taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '10 term at SUNY Canton.

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Chapter_12_13_Printable - Chapter 12 A d d re s s in g I...

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