Chapter 11 TAVSS

Chapter 11 TAVSS - CHEM 161-2007 CHAPTER 11 STATES OF...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–5. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
CHEM 161-2007 CHAPTER 11 – STATES OF MATTER AND INTERMOLECULAR FORCES PRACTICE PROBLEMS DR. ED TAVSS Intermolecular forces (e.g., H-bonding) Structures and types of solids (e.g., crystal structures) Phase changes and diagrams 1
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
INTERMOLECULAR FORCES (e.g., H-BONDING) 44 Chem 161-2006 Final Exam Intermolecular forces (dipole-dipole, London, etc.) Arrange the following from lowest boiling point to highest boiling point. 1. Cl 2 2. KCl 3. CCl 4 4. BCl 3 5. CaCl 2 A. 1<2<3<4<5 B. 4<3<1<5<2 C . 1<4<3<2<5 D. 1<3<4<2<5 E. 5<2<3<4<1 . . . . : Cl ― Cl : London dispersion forces; smaller than . . . . BCl 3 and CCl 4 due to smallest surface area. . . K :Cl: Electrostatic interaction; smaller than MgCl 2 . . due to Coulomb’s law. . . :Cl: . . | . . :Cl―C―Cl : London dispersion forces; stronger than BCl 3 and . . | . . Cl 2 , due to greatest surface area. :Cl: . . . . : Cl : . . | . . London dispersion forces; stronger : Cl ― B ― Cl : than Cl 2 , but weaker than CCl 4 , due . . . . to middle surface area. . . . . :Cl: Mg :Cl: Electrostatic interaction; stronger than . . . . KCl due to Coulomb’s law. 1 < 4 < 3 < 2 < 5 C 2
Background image of page 2
9 Chem 161-2006 Final Exam Intermolecular forces (dipole-dipole, London, etc.) Which one of the following compounds can hydrogen bond with itself? A. CH 3 CH 2 OCH 2 CH 3 B. (CH 3 CH 2 ) 3 N C. CH 3 CH 2 CH 2 CH 2 CH 3 D . CH 3 CH 2 CH 2 CH 2 OH E. CH 3 CH 2 CH 2 SH CH 3 CH 2 CH 2 CH 2 OH Hydrogen bonding requires Y = N, O or F Y ― H Y A. The hydrogens are bonded to carbons, not N, O or F. B. The hydrogens are bonded to carbons, not N, O or F. C. The hydrogens are bonded to carbons, not N, O or F. D. CH 3 CH 2 CH 2 CH 2 O—H CH 3 CH 2 CH 2 CH 2 O—H CH 3 CH 2 CH 2 CH 2 OH A hydrogen is covalently bonded to an oxygen within a given molecule, and hydrogen bonded to an oxygen of another molecule. E. The hydrogen is bonded to sulfur, not N, O or F. D 3
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
51. CHEM 161- 2004 FINAL EXAM + ANSWERS CHAPTER 10A: LIQUIDS AND SOLIDS INTERMOLECULAR FORCES (DIPOLE-DIPOLE, LONDON, ETC.) Hydrogen bonding may be used to explain which one of the following facts? A. Water is a polar molecule. B. The O-H covalent bond is more polar than the C-H covalent bond. C . NH 3 has a higher boiling point than PH 3 . D. H 2 O has a bent (angular) shape. E. HBr has a higher boiling point than HCl. A: Water is a polar molecule due to the difference in electronegativity of its atoms and its angular molecular structure, not due to hydrogen bonding. Hydrogen bonding is a consequence of water being a polar molecule. B: Hydrogen bonding does not explain the high polarity of the O-H covalent bond; the
Background image of page 4
Image of page 5
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 38

Chapter 11 TAVSS - CHEM 161-2007 CHAPTER 11 STATES OF...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 5. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online