Chapter%202 - 09/26/11 Chapter 2: The Court System and...

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09/26/11 Chapter 2: The Court System and Jurisdiction David Baumer, Spring 2003
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09/26/11 U.S. Court System Both the federal and state court systems are triangular At the bottom there are many trial courts There are fewer appeals courts and one supreme court At the federal level there are 646 District Court Judges 13 Circuit Courts of Appeal One Supreme Court with nine justices
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09/26/11 Trial Courts Trial courts determine the facts and apply existing law to those facts Juries are charged with making factual determinations , except when the parties waive their right to a jury, in which case In general appellate courts will not hear appeals of jury verdicts unless there is evidence of jury tampering or some other procedural irregularity
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09/26/11 Appellate Courts Appellate courts determine whether legal errors were made at the trial court level Most appeals are denied , as trial court decisions are affirmed Supreme courts can overrule decisions of appellate courts The U.S. Supreme Court is almost entirely an appellate court The U.S. Supreme agrees to hear only a fraction of the appeals made to it
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09/26/11 Appellate Courts Main function of appellate courts is to review trial courts for possible errors of law Possible errors of law include rulings the trial court on Motions made by either party Admission or non-admission of evidence Instructions to juries U.S. Courts of Appeals often hear appeals for decisions of administrative agencies such as the FTC, the PTO, and NLRB Decisions of trial courts are only reversed when the errors made are judged material . A mistake is material if it could have effected the outcome of the case.
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09/26/11 U.S. Supreme Court Mainly hears appeals from cases that either Have constitutional implications Resolve differences among the U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals Have significant social implications and are considered ripe--appropriate for resolution Appeals to the Supreme Court are based on writs of certiorari Issues majority, concurring and dissenting opinions
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09/26/11 Specialized Courts At both the federal and state levels there are specialized courts At the federal level there are specialized courts of bankruptcy, tax court, military courts At the state level there are specialized juvenile, probate, domestic relations courts Specialized courts do not have jurisdiction to resolve disputes outside their subject matter.
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09/26/11 Trial Courts In the federal courts, trial courts are called
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This note was uploaded on 09/26/2011 for the course BUSINESS 411 taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '11 term at Youngstown State University.

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Chapter%202 - 09/26/11 Chapter 2: The Court System and...

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